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(p. 332) Accommodating Race and Ethnicity in Parenting Interventions 

(p. 332) Accommodating Race and Ethnicity in Parenting Interventions
Chapter:
(p. 332) Accommodating Race and Ethnicity in Parenting Interventions
Author(s):

Divna M. Haslam

, and Anilena Mejia

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190629069.003.0030
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date: 24 September 2018

The parenting experience can be both similar and vastly different across different cultural contexts. This chapter outlines what culture is and the impact it has on family structure and functioning and beliefs about parenting. Discussed are the similarities and differences across common cultural dimensions and how knowledge of local cultural beliefs and values is critical in ensuring the successful implementation of parenting interventions is detailed. The importance of adapting evidence-based programs in a culturally appropriate way and of flexibly delivering interventions to fit a range of contexts without compromising program efficacy are addressed. Practical examples of low-risk adaptations are provided. Finally, the existing evidence of a range of Triple P program variants and a range of cultural contexts with a specific focus on low-resource settings are reviewed and practical are provided. The chapter concludes with a discussion about the implications and future directions research could take.

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