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Goals of Psychodynamic Therapy

Goals of Psychodynamic Therapy  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0003
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
3 Goals of Psychodynamic Therapy In psychotherapy, as in life more generally, it is usually a good idea to know where you want to go and what you would like to happen. Goals are an important part of this, and patients come to therapy with many of their own. They may want to “feel better,” “get over the past,” or “understand” themselves. Some may want other people in their life to be more amenable to their needs and wishes (i.e., they want to change others). Part of the therapist’s job is to “translate” the patient’s ideas into specific
The Psychodynamic “Stance”

The Psychodynamic “Stance”  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0004
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
4 The Psychodynamic “Stance” Stance (noun) is defined as 1. the way in which someone stands, especially when deliberately adopted (as in baseball, golf, and other sports); a person’s posture. 2. the attitude of a person or organization toward something; a standpoint. 3. a ledge or foothold on which a belay can be secured (climbing). (Oxford University Press, 2018) What does it mean to be a psychodynamic therapist? Are psychodynamic therapists, by virtue of being psychodynamic , linked together in any real and meaningful way? Do they somehow differ from the practitioners in other modalities?
Healing the Hidden Wounds of WarTreating the Combat Veteran with PTSD at Risk for Suicide

Healing the Hidden Wounds of War: Treating the Combat Veteran with PTSD at Risk for Suicide  

Herbert Hendin

in Handbook of Military and Veteran Suicide: Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2017
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Jun 2017
eISBN: 
9780199984770
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780199873616.003.0014
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Military Psychology, Clinical Adult Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199873616
Disorder: 
Suicide, Trauma
14 Healing the Hidden Wounds of War Treating the Combat Veteran with PTSD at Risk for Suicide Herbert Hendin Although storytellers and writers going back to Homer described the profound psychological effects of war on those who fought, it was not until World War I that psychiatrists in Austria and Germany began to describe in detail the traumatic reactions to combat. They concluded that combat trauma involved a breaking through of the individual’s defense against stimuli ( reitzschutz ). “Traumatic neurosis” was the result of fright ( schreck )—a condition occurring when one encountered a danger without being adequately
Psychological Treatments for Personality Disorders

Psychological Treatments for Personality Disorders  

Paul Crits-Christoph and Jacques P. Barber

in A Guide to Treatments That Work (4 edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2015
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780190244002
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780199342211.003.0027
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychopathology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199342211
27 Psychological Treatments for Personality Disorders Paul Crits-Christoph and Jacques P. Barber A type 2 randomized controlled trial (RCT) found that 20 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) led to greater improvement than either brief dynamic therapy or a waitlist control for DSM-IV avoidant personality disorder. Another type 2 RCT for avoidant personality disorder compared three group-administered behavioral interventions (graded exposure, standard social skills training, intimacy-focused social skills training) with a waitlist control; although all three treatments were more efficacious than the control condition, no differences among the treatments were identified either after the 10-week treatment
The Process of Clarification

The Process of Clarification  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0011
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
11 The Process of Clarification Introduction Listening to patients ( ) and asking good questions ( ) results in a lot of information. With verbose patients, the amount could be enormous. Our theories and case formulations help guide and direct our focus, but it is inevitable that we will sometimes be confused. Regardless of best intentions, words are imprecise, and patients often struggle to articulate painful and perplexing experiences that may never have been previously described. As a result, both patients and therapists are left to sort through, refine, and eventually understand these words, feelings,
The Process of Confrontation

The Process of Confrontation  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0012
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
12 The Process of Confrontation Introduction to Confrontation When you see the word “confrontation,” what comes to mind? Do you imagine two fighters squaring off in a ring, an aggressive lawyer dramatically pointing out inconsistencies to a floundering witness, or possibly two drunk people at a pub slurringly swearing at each other? If so, this is because confrontations are usually thought to involve some sort or conflict. In common parlance, they imply a moment of intense antagonism between two or more people ( ). If we used this definition, confrontation would seem to have little to no role in
The Process of Interpretation

The Process of Interpretation  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0013
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
13 The Process of Interpretation Introduction to Interpretation Interpretations are probably the most misunderstood (and fetishized) techniques in the history of psychodynamic therapy. Though they certainly play a key role in expressive work, they are not supernatural in their power or in their origins. Sadly, a naïve reader of certain older case studies could come away with a mistaken impression that interpretations only emerge—already fully formed —from the brilliant minds of master therapists. Although it is true that some interpretations come about from a sudden and “eureka-like” moment of clinical inspiration, far more are carefully deduced from a combination
Introduction

Introduction  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0001
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
1 Introduction Psychotherapy is a strange business. It is also very hard to do well. Both these statements make sense if you consider what psychotherapy really entails. At its core, psychotherapy is intended to alleviate human suffering through only a combination of words and a relationship . Other fields may use drugs, surgeries, deep brain stimulation, etc., but this is not the case in psychotherapy. For better or worse, it has always been a “talking cure” ( , p. 30) and remains so to this day. The various modalities—psychodynamic therapy included—just tend to speak a bit
The Process of Questioning

The Process of Questioning  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0010
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
10 The Process of Questioning Introduction to the Process of Questioning Questions can be powerful. They not only drive us to look closely at ourselves and the outside world but also prompt us to take action. We are all familiar with “existential” questions such as “Who am I?” “Why am I here?” “What does it mean to live a good life?” Asking these is part and parcel of being human. These queries also likely prompted the development of much of philosophy, religion, and the natural and human sciences. As such, questions have served as some of the most fundamental
Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy

Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy  

Allen H. Weg

in OCD Treatment Through Storytelling: A Strategy for Successful Therapy

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2011
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Jan 2015
eISBN: 
9780190231644
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780195383560.003.0002
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195383560
Disorder: 
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
2 Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy
Trust

Trust  

Allen H. Weg

in OCD Treatment Through Storytelling: A Strategy for Successful Therapy

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2011
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Jan 2015
eISBN: 
9780190231644
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780195383560.003.0007
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195383560
Disorder: 
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
7 Trust
Foundational Techniques Part I

Foundational Techniques Part I  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0008
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
8 Foundational Techniques Part I Before discussing the “classic” psychodynamic techniques (i.e., questions, clarifications, confrontations, and interpretations), it is important to cover what could be termed foundational techniques (see ). These skills not only foster psychodynamic processes but also help therapists maintain appropriate boundaries. Admittedly, they are not as dramatic or “sexy” as interpretations, for instance, but are nonetheless crucial, as they form the soil out of which more sophisticated interventions grow. Several of these (e.g., evenly-hovering attention, therapist anonymity) will be situated in a historical context, as they have undergone significant theoretical modifications
Characteristics of “Good” Psychodynamic Interventions

Characteristics of “Good” Psychodynamic Interventions  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0006
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
6 Characteristics of “Good” Psychodynamic Interventions If there is a cardinal law of psychoanalysis, it is to avoid talking nonsense . . . don’t throw out words that have meaning only to the analyst . — , p. 34) An old proverb states, “It’s not what you say, but how you say it.” In psychodynamic therapy, though, both need to be pretty good. Notice I did not say “perfect,” as there is no such thing as the perfect execution of any technique. Certain skills (e.g., phrasing, timing) never stop developing so long as they are continually practiced. Unfortunately for
Integration in PsychotherapyModels and Methods

Integration in Psychotherapy: Models and Methods  

Jeremy Holmes and Anthony Bateman (eds)

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2002
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Oct 2015
eISBN: 
9780191808067
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780192632371.001.0001
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780192632371
Models and Methods Part 1 Theory Part 2 Models and practice
Technique Factors in Treating Dysphoric Disorders

Technique Factors in Treating Dysphoric Disorders  

William C. Follette and Leslie S. Greenberg (eds)

in Principles of Therapeutic Change That Work

Print Publication Year: 
Sep 2005
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Jul 2015
eISBN: 
9780190242268
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780195156843.003.0004
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195156843
4 Technique Factors in Treating Dysphoric Disorders
Psychodynamic Therapy TechniquesA Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions  

Brian A. Sharpless

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.001.0001
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions Section I Background Information for Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques Section II The “Classic” Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques in Contemporary Practice Section III The Expanded Range of Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques
Psychodynamic psychotherapy

Psychodynamic psychotherapy  

John Marzillier

in The Trauma Therapies

Print Publication Year: 
Jul 2014
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
May 2015
eISBN: 
9780191807855
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780199674718.003.0008
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199674718
Chapter 8 Psychodynamic psychotherapy
Psychodynamic interpersonal therapy

Psychodynamic interpersonal therapy  

Frank Margison

in Integration in Psychotherapy: Models and Methods

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2002
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Oct 2015
eISBN: 
9780191808067
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780192632371.003.0007
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192632371
Chapter 7 Psychodynamic interpersonal therapy
Do We Really Need Psychodynamic Therapy?1

Do We Really Need Psychodynamic Therapy?1  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0002
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
2 Do We Really Need Psychodynamic Therapy? Introduction I do not assume that everyone reading this book is a fan of psychodynamic psychotherapy. When I began teaching and supervising in 2006, I soon noticed that a not insignificant proportion of students came to graduate training with negative preconceptions. Given some of the depictions found in movies, television, and undergraduate textbooks ( ; ), I do not blame them for their skepticism. If these were my only exposures to psychodynamic therapy, I might feel similarly. Along with misinformation, though, the field itself is partially to blame for
The Supportive–Expressive Continuum

The Supportive–Expressive Continuum  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0005
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
5 The Supportive–Expressive Continuum Be as expressive as you can be, and as supportive as you have to be . — , p. 688) Be as supportive as you can be so you can be as expressive as you will need to be . — , p. 214) As noted in , psychodynamic therapy is a very flexible treatment approach. It can be applied to patients who are high functioning (e.g., the “worried well,” classic neurotic problems), low-functioning (e.g., treatment-refractory schizophrenia), and just about any level in between. Until relatively recently, though, far more attention

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