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The Supportive–Expressive Continuum

The Supportive–Expressive Continuum  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0005
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
5 The Supportive–Expressive Continuum Be as expressive as you can be, and as supportive as you have to be . — , p. 688) Be as supportive as you can be so you can be as expressive as you will need to be . — , p. 214) As noted in , psychodynamic therapy is a very flexible treatment approach. It can be applied to patients who are high functioning (e.g., the “worried well,” classic neurotic problems), low-functioning (e.g., treatment-refractory schizophrenia), and just about any level in between. Until relatively recently, though, far more attention
Psychodynamic Therapy TechniquesA Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions  

Brian A. Sharpless

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.001.0001
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
book
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions Section I Background Information for Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques Section II The “Classic” Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques in Contemporary Practice Section III The Expanded Range of Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques
Background Knowledge of Psychotherapy

Background Knowledge of Psychotherapy  

Donald R. Nicholas

in Psychosocial Care of the Adult Cancer Patient: Evidence-Based Practice in Psycho-Oncology

Print Publication Year: 
Aug 2015
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Oct 2015
eISBN: 
9780190275327
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780199744442.003.0003
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199744442
3 Background Knowledge of Psychotherapy
Characteristics of “Good” Psychodynamic Interventions

Characteristics of “Good” Psychodynamic Interventions  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0006
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
6 Characteristics of “Good” Psychodynamic Interventions If there is a cardinal law of psychoanalysis, it is to avoid talking nonsense . . . don’t throw out words that have meaning only to the analyst . — , p. 34) An old proverb states, “It’s not what you say, but how you say it.” In psychodynamic therapy, though, both need to be pretty good. Notice I did not say “perfect,” as there is no such thing as the perfect execution of any technique. Certain skills (e.g., phrasing, timing) never stop developing so long as they are continually practiced. Unfortunately for
Introduction

Introduction  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0001
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
1 Introduction Psychotherapy is a strange business. It is also very hard to do well. Both these statements make sense if you consider what psychotherapy really entails. At its core, psychotherapy is intended to alleviate human suffering through only a combination of words and a relationship . Other fields may use drugs, surgeries, deep brain stimulation, etc., but this is not the case in psychotherapy. For better or worse, it has always been a “talking cure” ( , p. 30) and remains so to this day. The various modalities—psychodynamic therapy included—just tend to speak a bit
The Process of Clarification

The Process of Clarification  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0011
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
11 The Process of Clarification Introduction Listening to patients ( ) and asking good questions ( ) results in a lot of information. With verbose patients, the amount could be enormous. Our theories and case formulations help guide and direct our focus, but it is inevitable that we will sometimes be confused. Regardless of best intentions, words are imprecise, and patients often struggle to articulate painful and perplexing experiences that may never have been previously described. As a result, both patients and therapists are left to sort through, refine, and eventually understand these words, feelings,
The Process of Confrontation

The Process of Confrontation  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0012
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
12 The Process of Confrontation Introduction to Confrontation When you see the word “confrontation,” what comes to mind? Do you imagine two fighters squaring off in a ring, an aggressive lawyer dramatically pointing out inconsistencies to a floundering witness, or possibly two drunk people at a pub slurringly swearing at each other? If so, this is because confrontations are usually thought to involve some sort or conflict. In common parlance, they imply a moment of intense antagonism between two or more people ( ). If we used this definition, confrontation would seem to have little to no role in
The Process of Questioning

The Process of Questioning  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0010
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
10 The Process of Questioning Introduction to the Process of Questioning Questions can be powerful. They not only drive us to look closely at ourselves and the outside world but also prompt us to take action. We are all familiar with “existential” questions such as “Who am I?” “Why am I here?” “What does it mean to live a good life?” Asking these is part and parcel of being human. These queries also likely prompted the development of much of philosophy, religion, and the natural and human sciences. As such, questions have served as some of the most fundamental
Supportive Therapy Techniques Part I

Supportive Therapy Techniques Part I  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0014
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
14 Supportive Therapy Techniques Part I discussed the supportive–expressive continuum and noted key differences between these two overlapping approaches. then focused on expressive techniques as epitomized in the process of psychodynamic interpretation. This and the following chapter will elaborate on what therapists can do when working on the other side of the continuum. Why Do We Need Supportive Therapy Techniques? Supportive psychodynamic therapy has a long history. Early psychoanalysts such as Sandor Ferenczi and Otto Rank quickly found themselves dissatisfied with a one-size-fits-all approach to treatment (i.e., traditional psychoanalysis) and proposed substantial
Supportive psychotherapy as an integrative psychotherapy

Supportive psychotherapy as an integrative psychotherapy  

Susie Van Marle and Jeremy Holmes

in Integration in Psychotherapy: Models and Methods

Print Publication Year: 
Jan 2002
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Oct 2015
eISBN: 
9780191808067
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780192632371.003.0011
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780192632371
Chapter 11 Supportive psychotherapy as an integrative psychotherapy
Generalist psychiatric treatments for borderline personality disorder: the evidence base and common factors

Generalist psychiatric treatments for borderline personality disorder: the evidence base and common factors  

Anthony W. Bateman and Roy Krawitz

in Borderline Personality Disorder: An evidence-based guide for generalist mental health professionals

Print Publication Year: 
May 2013
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Aug 2015
eISBN: 
9780191808159
DOI: 
10.1093/med:psych/9780199644209.003.0002
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780199644209
Disorder: 
Personality Disorders
Chapter 2 Generalist psychiatric treatments for borderline personality disorder: the evidence base and common factors
Supportive Therapy Techniques Part II

Supportive Therapy Techniques Part II  

Brian A. Sharpless

in Psychodynamic Therapy Techniques: A Guide to Expressive and Supportive Interventions

Print Publication Year: 
Mar 2019
Series: 
Other
Published Online: 
Feb 2019
eISBN: 
9780190676308
DOI: 
10.1093/med-psych/9780190676278.003.0015
Specialty: 
Clinical Psychology, Psychosocial Interventions and Psychotherapy
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190676278
Disorder: 
Mood Disorders
15 Supportive Therapy Techniques Part II Specific Supportive Therapy Techniques Continued described how therapists can support patient self-esteem and foster the development of important adaptive skills. This chapter details the use of four more groups of clinical interventions and ends with a discussion of the process of “working through” in supportive dynamic therapies. Techniques to Reduce and Prevent Unhelpful Anxiety and Other Emotions Whereas the proper use of expressive techniques may require a temporary increase in patient anxiety (see ), this is not a primarily intention of supportive therapy. Patients appropriate

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