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(p. 117) Cognitive Behavioral Approaches for Treating Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder 

(p. 117) Cognitive Behavioral Approaches for Treating Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Chapter:
(p. 117) Cognitive Behavioral Approaches for Treating Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Author(s):

Caitlin M. Conner

, Lindsey DeVries

, and Judy Reaven

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190624828.003.0005
Page of

date: 21 April 2018

Cognitive behavior therapies (CBT) are empirically supported interventions that have been used to successfully treat many forms of psychopathology among children, adolescents, and adults. Developed in the 1960s and 1970s, CBT is an evidence-based amalgamation of cognitive and behavioral therapy components that aim to address maladaptive thoughts, emotions, and behaviors to promote symptom reduction through a collaborative therapeutic relationship. CBT has also been adapted for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); however, the primary focus of most treatment studies to date has focused on children with ASD and co-occurring anxiety. CBT programs for other psychiatric comorbid conditions in ASD are now emerging. Specific adaptations to traditional CBT, practical implications for clinicians, and suggestions for future directions for research will be highlighted.

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