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(p. 395) Measuring Child, Parent, and Family Outcomes at Individual and Population Levels 

(p. 395) Measuring Child, Parent, and Family Outcomes at Individual and Population Levels
Chapter:
(p. 395) Measuring Child, Parent, and Family Outcomes at Individual and Population Levels
Author(s):

Alina Morawska

, and Matthew R. Sanders

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190629069.003.0036
Page of

date: 25 May 2018

The hallmark of evidence-based approaches to parenting support is the systematic, comprehensive, and continuing measurement of outcomes, over time, across individuals and groups. The chapter beings by describing the typical targets of parenting intervention (e.g., child behavior and adjustment; parenting behavior and self-efficacy) as well as less frequently assessed, more distal, intervention targets (e.g., parent adjustment, couple relationships). The common types of assessments and best practice approaches to assessment are described. In particular, approaches to measuring individual child, parenting, and family outcomes, as well as approaches to measuring population-level outcomes are detailed. Finally, commonly used approaches to assess the effects of Triple P are outlined.

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