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(p. 17) The Evaluation: Data Gathering and Interview Strategy 

(p. 17) The Evaluation: Data Gathering and Interview Strategy
Chapter:
(p. 17) The Evaluation: Data Gathering and Interview Strategy
Author(s):

Steve Rubenzer

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190653163.003.0002
Page of

date: 11 December 2018

This chapter considers evaluation strategies beginning from receipt of the referral to the conclusion of the interview. It emphasizes the value of obtaining information before the evaluation, particularly from police reports, input from the defense attorney, and school and/or psychiatric records. Examiners are encouraged to covertly observe the examinee’s speech and demeanor and to seek out sources of collateral information, which may include data from jails and people in the community. The importance of avoiding bias and focusing on relevant information is emphasized. The limitations of collateral sources, such as from treatment providers and disability exams from institutions such as the Veterans Administration and Social Security Administration, are highlighted. The use of Internet data and associated ethical considerations are discussed, and demographic factors and behavioral indicators of feigning or poor effort are presented.

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