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(p. 52) Keeping Clients in Treatment as Long as Possible Is an Effective Practice-Building Strategy 

(p. 52) Keeping Clients in Treatment as Long as Possible Is an Effective Practice-Building Strategy
Chapter:
(p. 52) Keeping Clients in Treatment as Long as Possible Is an Effective Practice-Building Strategy
Author(s):

Jeffrey E. Barnett

, and Jeffrey Zimmerman

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190900762.003.0010
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date: 19 March 2019

Some mental health clinicians may think that it is best to keep clients in treatment as long as possible. After all, this might be seen as an effective way to ensure the stability of one’s private practice, especially for those who are not familiar with how to market their practice effectively. This chapter illustrates how this practice is actually counterproductive to the goal of maintaining a steady client base. It likely will alienate and displease clients and referral sources alike, discourage potential future clients from seeking treatment, place the clinician at risk ethically and legally, and not be a sustainable business practice. This chapter illustrates how meeting each client’s clinical needs appropriately, and helping them toward independent functioning as quickly as is reasonably possible, will actually be a practice-building strategy that will encourage more referrals and a more financially successful practice.

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