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(p. 15) Philosophical, conceptual, and ethical perspectives on working with goals in therapy 

(p. 15) Philosophical, conceptual, and ethical perspectives on working with goals in therapy
Chapter:
(p. 15) Philosophical, conceptual, and ethical perspectives on working with goals in therapy
Author(s):

John McLeod

and Thomas Mackrill

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780198793687.003.0002
Page of

date: 24 September 2018

This chapter explores the underlying assumptions that inform goal-oriented therapy, with the aim of examining the relevance of different critical perspectives on contemporary theory and research into therapeutic goals. An appreciation of what it means to talk about goals requires thinking about some of the basic questions around human experience and existence, including the nature of free will, time, causality, and explanation; and the ways in which realities are constructed through language and conversation. The chapter also discusses important ethical and moral dilemmas associated with processes through which goals are co-created within relationships characterized by differences in power and authority, and the forms of research and inquiry that might yield practical knowledge of relevance to clinical practice in this area.

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