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(p. 35) Letter to the British Medical Journal: Psychology in the Child’s Education 

(p. 35) Letter to the British Medical Journal: Psychology in the Child’s Education
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(p. 35) Letter to the British Medical Journal: Psychology in the Child’s Education
Author(s):

Donald W. Winnicott

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780190271350.003.0003
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date: 23 January 2018

In this letter to the British Medical Journal, Winnicott discusses how good citizenship comes from the life of the child in his own home, including the first relationship between infant and mother. On the basis of this relationship, more complex relationships are developed at home and in the wider world. If these things fail, citizenship (or something else) has to be taught. Among other issues, he insists that professionals should refrain from interference with infants and small children, that avoidable physical treatment should not be undertaken, nor should infants and small children be taken from home except in case of dire necessity. He reminds the reader that no-one can tell a mother how to be a mother or a teacher how to teach; parents and teachers have to carry on intuitively.

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