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(p. 548) Considerations in Closing a Private Practice 

(p. 548) Considerations in Closing a Private Practice
Chapter:
(p. 548) Considerations in Closing a Private Practice
Author(s):

Janet T. Thomas

and Steven Walfish

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780190272166.003.0042
Page of

date: 20 September 2017

The prospect of closing a practice can be daunting. It is a task eventually faced by nearly all psychologists, counselors, family therapists, and social workers who provide psychotherapy, assessment, or forensic services in the context of an independent practice. Retirement, financial difficulties, license suspension or revocation, and serious health problems are among the circumstances prompting a practice closing. Clinicians must think through and develop a practice closing plan that takes into account client needs, legal and ethical requirements, and the need for emotional preparation. This chapter addresses related clinical issues such as client notification, continuity of care, transference, and countertransference. The authors describe common ethical challenges and make recommendations regarding informed consent, confidentiality, and the maintenance and storage of clinical records for both closing and selling a practice.

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