Show Summary Details
Page of

(p. 166) Healing the Hidden Wounds of War: Treating the Combat Veteran with PTSD at Risk for Suicide 

(p. 166) Healing the Hidden Wounds of War: Treating the Combat Veteran with PTSD at Risk for Suicide
Chapter:
(p. 166) Healing the Hidden Wounds of War: Treating the Combat Veteran with PTSD at Risk for Suicide
Author(s):

Herbert Hendin

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199873616.003.0014
Page of

date: 22 January 2018

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the condition most associated with suicide in both military personnel and veterans. Most veterans with PTSD, however, are not at risk of suicide. The major factor distinguishing those who attempted or were preoccupied with suicide is persistent severe guilt over behavior in combat while emotionally out of control. A short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (12 sessions), presented in this chapter, showed promise of success in dissipating the guilt from combat-related actions in veterans of the war in Vietnam. Preliminary work with combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan indicates it may be equally successful in treating them. Basic aspects of the psychodynamic approach could be incorporated into current therapies and should improve clinicians’ ability to treat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide. Case examples are provided.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Clinical Psychology requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.