Show Summary Details
Page of

(p. 74) Father–Child Relationships: The Missing Link Between Parenting Time and Children’s Mental and Physical Health 

(p. 74) Father–Child Relationships: The Missing Link Between Parenting Time and Children’s Mental and Physical Health
Chapter:
(p. 74) Father–Child Relationships: The Missing Link Between Parenting Time and Children’s Mental and Physical Health
Author(s):

William V. Fabricius

, Karina R. Sokol

, Priscilla Diaz

, and Sanford L. Braver

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199396580.003.0004
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY ONLINE (www.oxfordclinicalpsych.com). © Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Clinical Psychology Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 05 April 2020

We argue that the research on parenting time continues to suffer from several limitations. One is reliance on measures of frequency of contact enshrined in national data sets. Instead, we need new measures of amount of parenting time. Now that more parents are following detailed parenting plans, those plans can be converted into measures of yearly percentages of parenting time with each parent. A second limitation is lack of good developmental theory by which to understand how parenting time works to affect children’s adjustment. The continued use of existing measures in national data sets exerts a dampening effect on theorizing because complex constructs are often represented in the data sets with single-item measures, which researchers then combine in idiosyncratic ways. We need to use valid measures of constructs such as parent–child relationships and parenting quality, in addition to parenting time. These are serious problems for research that has implications for public policy and family law. A better understanding of parenting time is beginning to emerge in recent studies, many from Europe. These studies reveal that parenting time and even frequency of contact are consistently related to higher quality of father–child relationships. Sophisticated models of how parent–child relationships mediate effects of parenting time on child adjustment remain scare, however.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Clinical Psychology requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.