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(p. 75) Understanding Post-Traumatic Adjustment Trajectories in School-Age Youth: Supporting Stress Resistance, Resilient Recovery, and Growth 

(p. 75) Understanding Post-Traumatic Adjustment Trajectories in School-Age Youth: Supporting Stress Resistance, Resilient Recovery, and Growth
Chapter:
(p. 75) Understanding Post-Traumatic Adjustment Trajectories in School-Age Youth: Supporting Stress Resistance, Resilient Recovery, and Growth
Author(s):

Christopher M. Layne

, and Stevan Hobfoll

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190052737.003.0005
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date: 08 April 2020

Children and adolescents experience a wide range of reactions to trauma and loss, which can change over time and across development. Accurately recognizing and describing how youth are responding to life adversities is a key step in creating a trauma-informed school. Drawing on various theories, the authors propose 10 trajectories of post-traumatic adjustment. These consist of four trajectories of positive adjustment (stress resistance, resilient recovery, delayed recovery, and growth) and six trajectories of generally maladaptive adjustment (decline, delayed decline [sleeper effects], distress tolerance, phasic adjustment, severe decline, and chronic maladaptive functioning). The authors then describe key propositions of conservation of resource theory and propose how different resource qualities (e.g., potency, durability, accessibility) can contribute to different adjustment trajectories. They then consider how to use these resource qualities as a problem-solving tool for intervention planning and, more broadly, to help create school environments that steer children and adolescents towards positive post-traumatic adjustment trajectories, including stress resistance, resilient recovery, and growth.

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