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(p. 125) Students Experiencing Homelessness 

(p. 125) Students Experiencing Homelessness
Chapter:
(p. 125) Students Experiencing Homelessness
Author(s):

Diana Bowman

, and Patricia A. Popp

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190052737.003.0007
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date: 08 April 2020

Children and youth who experience homelessness are among the most vulnerable and invisible of at-risk students. Poor academic performance and low graduation rates result from school mobility, unmet basic needs, poor health, and trauma. Teachers can mitigate the impacts of homelessness on students by making the most of the brief time a homeless student may be in their classroom, being an accessible and caring adult in the child’s or youth’s life, and working with the school district’s homeless liaison to connect the child or youth to supports both in the school and in the community. Teachers should be familiar with the McKinney-Vento Act, which is federal legislation that ensures that schools and school districts remove barriers to the education of students experiencing homelessness. Services may include tutoring, transportation, free meals, and counseling. Schools can be a haven for safety, normalcy, and hope for children and youth who experience homelessness.

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