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(p. 3) Developing Criteria for Evidence-Based Assessment: An Introduction to Assessments That Work 

(p. 3) Developing Criteria for Evidence-Based Assessment: An Introduction to Assessments That Work
Chapter:
(p. 3) Developing Criteria for Evidence-Based Assessment: An Introduction to Assessments That Work
Author(s):

John Hunsley

, and Eric J. Mash

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190492243.003.0001
Page of

date: 21 October 2019

For many professional psychologists, assessment is viewed as a unique and defining feature of their expertise. Criteria for evaluating the scientific evidence supporting clinical instruments are presented in this chapter, including criteria for norms, reliability, validity, and clinical utility. These criteria are used by chapter authors in this volume in their condition-specific reviews of assessment instruments used for (a) diagnosis, (b) case conceptualization and treatment planning, and (c) treatment monitoring and treatment evaluation. Selecting and using scientifically sound instruments is a necessary starting point for evidence-based practice, but a remaining challenge is for professionals to integrate the resulting assessment data in a manner that is itself evidence-based.

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