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(p. 329) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults 

(p. 329) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults
Chapter:
(p. 329) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults
Author(s):

Samantha J. Moshier

, Kelly S. Parker-Guilbert

, Brian P. Marx

, and Terence M. Keane

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190492243.003.0016
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date: 25 August 2019

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was originally conceptualized as a relatively rare response to extraordinary and severe stressors, such as war, violent acts, vehicular or industrial accidents, sexual assault, and other disasters or events that are outside the range of usual human experience. Today, traumatic events and PTSD are viewed as worldwide phenomena that are prevalent and cross all subgroups of the population. This chapter focuses on the assessment of PTSD. It begins with a review of the nature of the disorder, which is followed by a review of clinical assessment instruments designed for the assessment purposes of (a) diagnosis, (b) case conceptualization and treatment planning, and (c) treatment monitoring and evaluation. Recommendations are included for instruments with the greatest scientific support and for assessing PTSD in a clinically sensitive manner.

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