Show Summary Details
Page of

(p. 22) Ethical Challenges Conducting Pediatric Research in the Era of Scarce Drugs 

(p. 22) Ethical Challenges Conducting Pediatric Research in the Era of Scarce Drugs
Chapter:
(p. 22) Ethical Challenges Conducting Pediatric Research in the Era of Scarce Drugs
Author(s):

Yoram Unguru

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190647254.003.0003
Page of

date: 06 December 2019

Scarcities of drugs have broad implications across health systems, including research. Insofar as clinical research trials, drug shortages adversely affect trial enrollment, result in protocol deviations and modifications, and, ultimately, impede the ability to advance the state of science. At the patient level, drug shortages compromise patient choice, minimize contributions of patients already enrolled in research studies while simultaneously exposing them to risk of harm without the potential for benefit, and waste valuable time that for some research participants may be irrecoverable. Before embarking on a clinical trial, clinician-investigators and sponsors must engage in transparent discussions with one another and with research ethics committees and relevant public bodies concerning researchers’ reciprocity-based obligations, post-trial access, and balancing generalizable knowledge with participant/proxy hope for therapies determined to be beneficial.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Clinical Psychology requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.