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(p. 105) The Developmental Theory of Embodiment: Protective Social Factors that Enhance Positive Embodiment 

(p. 105) The Developmental Theory of Embodiment: Protective Social Factors that Enhance Positive Embodiment
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(p. 105) The Developmental Theory of Embodiment: Protective Social Factors that Enhance Positive Embodiment
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DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190841874.003.0011
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date: 22 February 2020

This chapter reviews the developmental theory of embodiment, which is an integrated, research-based social theory that aims to predict, through the delineation of both protective and risk factors, the quality of embodied lives among girls and women across the life span. According to the theory, social experiences shape girls’ and women’s quality of embodied lives via three core pathways: the physical domain, the mental domain of social discourses and expectations, and the social power and relational connections domain. Each of these domains includes protective (and risk) factors: physical freedom (vs. corseting), mental freedom (vs. corseting also), and social power and relational connections (vs. disempowerment and disconnection). This chapter explicates these domains and their corresponding protective and risk factors. The developmental theory of embodiment has implications to a range of health promotion interventions and to constructive social transformations, which are discussed in this chapter.

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