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(p. 94) Irritability Development from Middle Childhood Through Adolescence: Trajectories, Concurrent Conditions, and Outcomes 

(p. 94) Irritability Development from Middle Childhood Through Adolescence: Trajectories, Concurrent Conditions, and Outcomes
Chapter:
(p. 94) Irritability Development from Middle Childhood Through Adolescence: Trajectories, Concurrent Conditions, and Outcomes
Author(s):

Cynthia Kiefer

, and Jillian Lee Wiggins

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190846800.003.0006
Page of

date: 18 August 2019

The current review traces the longitudinal course of pediatric irritability from middle childhood through adulthood. Irritability is a symptom dimension characterized by angry mood and temper outbursts and is fairly common in middle childhood through adolescence. While irritability generally demonstrates some decline over time, both clinical and normative levels of irritability in middle childhood predict functional impairment and internalizing and externalizing symptoms through adolescence. The link between pediatric irritability and internalizing symptoms persists into adulthood. Pediatric irritability uniquely predicts suicidality in addition to adult psychopathology and impairment. Despite the serious consequences of pediatric irritability across development, there are few effective treatments for irritability. Taken together, these studies suggest that focus on early treatment and prevention of irritability symptoms in childhood may help mitigate lasting negative outcomes in adulthood.

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