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(p. 149) Genetics of Pediatric Irritability 

(p. 149) Genetics of Pediatric Irritability
Chapter:
(p. 149) Genetics of Pediatric Irritability
Author(s):

Meridith L. Eastman

, Ashlee A. Moore

, and Roxann Roberson-Nay

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190846800.003.0008
Page of

date: 25 August 2019

This chapter provides an overview of behavioral and molecular genetics of pediatric irritability. Literature searches using PubMed and PsycInfo databases yielded 37 relevant animal and human studies on irritability. Studies of rodent and primate models initially suggested a genetic etiology for the trait and influenced selection of candidate genes for study in human studies. Behavioral genetic studies of irritability suggest that pediatric irritability is likely influenced by additive genetic and nonshared unique environmental factors, with little to no influence of dominant genetic or shared family environmental factors. Molecular genetic studies have been largely limited to candidate genes with a few emerging genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Results from the candidate gene literature on irritability are inconclusive, and GWAS in clinical populations has yielded limited findings. Future genetic studies of irritability would benefit from the use of appropriate phenotypic measures, adequate sample sizes, and multimethod and longitudinal approaches.

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