Show Summary Details
Page of

(p. 117) Documentation and Record Keeping Are Burdens to Be Completed as Quickly as Possible: The Less Said, the Better 

(p. 117) Documentation and Record Keeping Are Burdens to Be Completed as Quickly as Possible: The Less Said, the Better
Chapter:
(p. 117) Documentation and Record Keeping Are Burdens to Be Completed as Quickly as Possible: The Less Said, the Better
Author(s):

Jeffrey E. Barnett

, and Jeffrey Zimmerman

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190900762.003.0021
Page of

date: 21 May 2019

Documentation and record keeping are not known as the most enjoyable aspects of being a mental health clinician. Yet, as this chapter explains, they play a vital and important role in meeting one’s ethical and legal obligations. Further, it is explained how timely, thorough, effective documentation can help mental health practitioners to fulfill their obligation to provide the highest possible quality of care. Information is also provided on how clinical records may be needed in the future, and the risks associated with minimal or absent documentation. The role of documentation as a risk management strategy, to meet legal requirements, and to assist in providing high-quality care are each addressed. Specific guidance is provided on the needed components of effective documentation.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Clinical Psychology requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.