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(p. 143) Private Practice Is a Solitary Pursuit: There Is No Need to Work with Others 

(p. 143) Private Practice Is a Solitary Pursuit: There Is No Need to Work with Others
Chapter:
(p. 143) Private Practice Is a Solitary Pursuit: There Is No Need to Work with Others
Author(s):

Jeffrey E. Barnett

, and Jeffrey Zimmerman

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190900762.003.0025
Page of

date: 21 May 2019

Private practice in mental health care is a rather solitary pursuit. Although mental health private practice may be a greatly rewarding experience, it brings with it a number of challenges that must be addressed to ensure clinical competence and effectiveness. This chapter addresses how consultation and collaboration with colleagues can be of benefit from a business perspective, from a clinical standpoint, and for the clinician’s own well-being. Numerous examples are provided to illustrate the potential risks associated with professional isolation and the many likely benefits associated with active and appropriate consultation with colleagues. The use of colleagues for office sharing to reduce expenses, for clinical consultation to provide better client care, and for emotional support are explained. The risk of developing burnout as a private mental health practitioner is explained and how the use of colleagues can help prevent it is illustrated.

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