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(p. 264) Teaching Emotional Self-Regulation to Children and Adolescents 

(p. 264) Teaching Emotional Self-Regulation to Children and Adolescents
Chapter:
(p. 264) Teaching Emotional Self-Regulation to Children and Adolescents
Author(s):

Philip J. Lazarus

and Annela Costa

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190918873.003.0014
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date: 15 January 2021

Emotional self-regulation is the ability to modify emotional reactions and their subsequent expression through behaviors by being able to recognize, understand, and integrate emotional information. Characteristics of poor emotional self-regulation include heightened emotional responses, difficulty focusing attention or inhibiting behaviors, and low tolerance levels accompanied by high frustration. Poor emotional self-regulation has been associated with a plethora of mental health problems, which includes conduct disorders, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, and nonsuicidal self-injury. In this chapter, the authors discuss how emotional self-regulation develops and its impact on children and youth. Further, they describe practical universal and targeted strategies to increase competence in emotional self-regulation. A case is presented, based on research evidence, that emotional self-regulation skills can be taught and learned, and children benefit by developing skills to manage their emotions. Furthermore, schools are ideal places to help students become more adroit in these skills.

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