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(p. 61) Building Culturally Responsive Schools: A Model Based on the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development’s Whole Child Approach 

(p. 61) Building Culturally Responsive Schools: A Model Based on the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development’s Whole Child Approach
Chapter:
(p. 61) Building Culturally Responsive Schools: A Model Based on the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development’s Whole Child Approach
Author(s):

Janine Jones

and Antoinette Halsell Miranda

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780190918873.003.0004
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date: 25 January 2021

Public education in the United States is built on an unstable foundation of educational inequity. Educational achievement gaps, disproportionate discipline, and fiscal disinvestment all affect the socioemotional health of youth in schools. School reform efforts must include building the socioemotional well-being of students while also targeting systems-level change. Further, a comprehensive approach that attacks multiple problems of practice simultaneously as symptoms of a systemic problem is needed. In a culturally responsive school, personnel hold in constant an awareness the existence of educational inequity; they intentionally work toward for systems level change and support the needs of the whole child. This chapter presents a comprehensive method of facilitating systems level change that is holistically addressing the school context while also supporting the whole child. Building on the five tenets of the whole child approach, the chapter provides practical recommendations for implementation while building a culturally responsive school.

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