Show Summary Details
Page of

Online Appendix of Positive Clinical Psychology Resources 

Online Appendix of Positive Clinical Psychology Resources
Author(s):

Tayyab Rashid

and Martin Seligman

Page of

date: 16 June 2019

This appendix contains positive psychotherapy–related resources that are not included in either the corresponding clinician manual or client workbook. The appendix is organized into the following sections.

Books

Clinically Focused Positive Psychology (with Annotated Bibliography)

Burns, G. W. (2010). Happiness, healing and enhancement: Your casebook collection for applying positive psychology in therapy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

This 27-chapter volume, written by leading practitioners of positive psychology, provides some very compelling case illustrations regarding the clinical use of positive psychology exercises with clients in distress. Many of the chapters offer step-by-step strategies, most of which are empirically based.

Conoley, C. W., & Scheel, J. M. (2017). Goal focused positive psychotherapy: A strengths-based approach. New York: Oxford University Press.

Integrating a strength-oriented therapeutic approach with a theory of change, this book presents a session-by-session nonpathologizing model of therapy and introduces a specific set of techniques under the rubric of Goal Focused Positive Psychotherapy (GFPP). GFPP is informed by the Broaden-and-Build Theory of positive emotions. It promotes the therapeutic process by utilizing client strengths, hope, positive emotions, and goals. The goals in GFPP are based upon clients’ values and personal meaning (i.e., approach goals and intrinsic goals), identification, and the use of clients’ personal strengths (including client culture).

Fluckinger, C., Wusten, G., Zinbarg, R., & Wampold, B. (2009). Resource activation: Using clients’ own strengths in psychotherapy and counseling. Boston: Hogrefe.

This brief (68-page) guide offers practical clinical strategies to ask meaningful questions to elicit unrecognized courage that clients have, to persevere through truly tough times. The book emphasizes that the activation of client resources by focusing on strengths is not incompatible with distress remediation—it is simply a very positive and effective way to increase client well-being and reduce distress.

Joseph, S., & Linley, A. (2006). Positive therapy: A meta-theory for positive psychological practice. New York: Routledge.

From two leading voices in the applied positive psychology field, this book argues that therapy is not so much about what you do as how you do it, emphasizing the influence of the views clinicians hold about human nature. While discussing the meta-theory of positive psychology, the authors provide insights about how to reframe client beliefs using a positive psychological perspective.

Magyar-Moe, J. L. (2009). Therapist’s guide to positive psychological interventions. New York: Elsevier Academic Press.

This book introduces positive interventions and integrates them with counseling and psychotherapy. It includes a section on positive psychological tests and measures and a comprehensive chapter on a number of positive psychology interventions, each described in detail. The final part of the book discusses ways of carrying out a positive psychology–infused treatment plan.

Niemiec, R. (2017). Character strengths interventions: A field guide for practitioners. Boston: Hogrefe.

This is one of the most comprehensive books on the application of character strengths for a diverse range of practitioners. It organizes and describes character strengths with supporting evidence. The book offers core concepts and discusses advanced issues in applying character strengths, such as the over- and underuse of strengths and how strengths create synergies or collide with each other. The book also includes practitioner-friendly handouts.

Parks, A. C., & Schueller, S. (Eds.). (2014). Handbook of positive psychological interventions. Chichester, UK: Wiley Blackwell.

This volume collates a wide range of positive psychology interventions on diverse topics, including courage, empathy and humor, gratitude, forgiveness, and a multitude of character strengths. The handbook also includes topics such as ethics and motivation and discusses how practice and research can move forward in a concerted way.

Ruini, C. (2017). Positive psychology in clinical domains: Research & practice. New York: Springer.

Building a bridge, this book tries to integrate clinical psychology with positive psychology in a meaningful and nuanced way that enhances therapeutic outcomes. The first part provides a theoretical framework, whereas the second part provides a review of positive interventions in clinical practice and psychotherapeutic settings. These interventions are derived from positive psychology, from longstanding traditions in clinical psychology and psychiatry, and from Eastern clinical and philosophical approaches.

Slade, M., Brownell, T., Rashid, T., & Schrank, B. (2017). Positive psychotherapy for psychosis: A clinician’s guide and manual. New York: Routledge.

Positive Psychotherapy for Psychosis specifically applies positive psychotherapy (PPT) to psychosis. The book contains guidance on adapting the approach for use in individual treatments and on providing PPT as a stand-alone treatment, by integrating it, or by using it as a supplemental treatment. The book is divided in two parts. The first part describes theoretical foundations, while the second part offers a structured, step-by-step manual and useful tips for therapists in providing an evidence-based intervention that reduces symptoms and improves well-being.

Wood, A., & Johnson, J. (2016). The handbook of positive clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

This is the first volume to provide the most relevant ideas and applications to steer the emerging area of positive clinical psychology in the right direction. The volume offers insightful expert opinion on applications such as positive assessment, positive mood, resilience, self-efficacy, empathy, and psychotherapy for specific disorders including depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychosis, and suicidal behavior.

Integrating Positive Psychology and Established Treatments and Concepts

The following books integrate various therapeutic approaches and related concepts (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT], family therapy, quality of life therapy, meaning) in clinical and counseling practices.

Bennink, F. (2012). Practicing positive CBT: From reducing distress to building success. New York: Wiley Blackwell.

Conoley, C. W., & Conoley, J. C. (2009). Positive psychology and family therapy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Frisch, M. (2006). Quality of life therapy: Applying a life satisfaction approach to positive psychology an cognitive therapy. New York: Wiley.

Froh, J., & Parks, A. (2012). Activities for teaching positive psychology: A guide for instructors. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2014). Applied positive psychology: Integrated positive practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Walsh, B. (2003). Counseling psychology and optimal human functioning. New York: Routledge.

Describing Positive Psychology Interventions

Ben-Shahar, T. D. (2010). Being happy: You don’t have to be perfect to lead a richer, happier life. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Emmons, R. A. (2013). Gratitude works! A 21-day program for creating emotional prosperity. San Francisco: Jossey-Boss.

Fredrickson, B. (2009). Positivity: Discover the ratio that tips your life toward flourishing. New York: Crown.

Lyubormirsky, S. (2008). The how of happiness: A new approach to getting the life you want. New York: Penguin.

Seligman, M. E. P. (2002). Authentic happiness: Using the new positive psychology to realize your potential for lasting fulfillment. New York: Free Press.

Overviews and Introductions to Positive Psychology

Boniwell, I. (2012). Positive psychology in a nutshell: The science of happiness (3rd ed.). London: McGraw-Hill.

Compton, W. C., & Hoffman, E. (2012). Positive psychology: The science of happiness and flourishing. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Fredrikson, B. L. (2013). Love 2.0: Finding happiness and health in moments of connection. New York: Hudson Press.

Positive Psychology in Educational Settings

Bolt, D., McCormick, A., & Shaw, J. (2011). Teach positive: Applying the science of positive psychology to the classroom. Melbourne: Contemporary Brilliance Publications.

Gilman, R., Huebner, E. S., & Furlong, M. J. (2009). Handbook of positive psychology in schools. London: Taylor & Francis.

Morris, I. (2009). Teaching happiness and wellbeing in schools: Learning to ride elephants. New York: Continuum.

Morrison, M. (2007). Using humor to maximize learning the links between positive emotions and education. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education.

Norrish, J. M. (2015). Positive education: The Geelong Grammar School journey. New York: Oxford University Press.

Seligman, M. E. P, White, M. A., & Murray, S. A. (2015). Evidence-based approaches in positive education: Implementing a strategic framework for well-being in schools. New York: Springer.

Suldo, S. M. (2016). Promoting student happiness: Positive psychology interventions in schools. New York: Guilford Press.

Wade, J. C., Marks, L. I., & Hetzel, R. D. (2015). Positive psychology on the college campus. New York: Oxford University Press.

Integrating Positive and Negative Emotions

Gruber, J., & Moskowitz, J. T. (2014). Positive emotion: Integrating the light sides and dark sides. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kashdan, T. B., & Biswas-Diener, R. (2014). The upside of your dark side: Why being your whole self—not just your “good” self—drives success and fulfillment. New York: Penguin Random House.

Parrott, G. W. (2014). The positive side of negative emotion. New York. Guilford Press.

Happiness and Well-being

Diener, E., & Biswas-Diener, R. (2008). Happiness: Unlocking the mysteries of psychological wealth. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Gilbert, D. (2007). Stumbling on happiness. New York: Vintage.

Haidt, H. (2006). The happiness hypothesis: Finding modern truth in ancient wisdom. New York: Basic Books.

Hanson, R. (2016). Hardwiring happiness: The new brain science of contentment, calm, and confidence. New York: Harmony.

Layard, R. (2005). Happiness: Lessons from a new science. New York: Penguin.

Lyubomirsky, S. (2014). The myths of happiness: What should make you happy, but doesn’t, what shouldn’t make you happy, but does. New York: Penguin.

Seligman, M. E. P. (2011). Flourish: A visionary new understanding of happiness and well-being. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Character Strengths

Clifton, D. O., Anderson, E. C., & Schreiner, L. A. (2006). Strengths quest: Discover and develop your strengths in academics, career, and beyond (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Gallup.

Duckworth, A. (2016). Grit: The power of passion and perseverance. Toronto: HarperCollins.

Emmons, R. A. (2008). Thanks! How practicing gratitude can make you happier. New York: Mariner Books.

Jewell, L. (2017). Wire your brain for confidence: The science of conquering self-doubt. Toronto: Famous Warrior Press.

Peterson, C. (2012). Pursuing the good life: 100 reflections on positive psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

Polly, S., & Britton, K. H. (2015). Character strengths matter: How to live a full life. Charleston, SC: Positive Psychology News.

Reivich, K., & Shatte, A. (2002). The resilience factor: Seven keys to finding your inner strength and overcoming life’s hurdles. New York: Broadway.

Sacks, O. (2015). Gratitude. London: Knopf.

Yeager, J. M., Fisher, S. W., & Shearon, D. N. (2011). Smart strengths: A parent-teacher-coach guide to building character, resilience, and relationships in youth. Putnam Valley, NY: Kravis.

Handbooks and Encyclopedias

Calhoun, L. G., & Tedeschi, R. G. (2006). Handbook of posttraumatic growth: Research and practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Cameron, K., & Spreitezer, X. (2011). The Oxford handbook of positive organizational scholarship. New York: Oxford University Press.

Cooperrider, D., Whitney, D., & Stavros, J. (2008). Appreciative inquiry handbook (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.

Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Csikszentmihalyi, I. (Eds.). (2006). A life worth living: Contributions to positive psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

David, S. A., Boniwell, I., & Ayers, A. C. (2013). The Oxford handbook of happiness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Linley, A. P., Harrington, S., & Garcea, N. (2013). The Oxford handbook of positive psychology and work. New York: Oxford University Press.

Lopez, S. J. (Ed.). (2009). The encyclopedia of positive psychology. New York: Wiley.

Lopez, S. J., & Snyder, C. R. (2011). Oxford handbook of positive psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Michalos, A. (2014). Encyclopedia of quality of life and well-being research. New York: Springer.

Ong, A. D., & Van, D. M. H. M. (2007). Oxford handbook of methods in positive psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Peterson, C., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2004). Character strengths and virtues: A handbook and classification. New York: Oxford University Press.

Pluess, M. (2015). Genetics of psychological well-being: The role of heritability and genes in positive psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

Wehmeyer, M. L. (2013). The Oxford handbook of positive psychology and disability. New York: Oxford University Press.

Criticism of Positive Psychology

Ehrenreich, B. (2009). Bright-sided: How positive thinking is undermining America. New York: Metropolitan Books.

Moneta, G. B. (2013). Positive psychology: A critical introduction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan

Power, M. (2015). Understanding happiness: A critical review of positive psychology. Singapore: Routledge.

Wilson, E. (2008). Against happiness: In praise of melancholy. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Miscellaneous (Specific Topics)

Achor, S. (2011). The happiness advantage: The seven principles that fuel success and performance at work. New York: Crown.

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997). Finding flow: The psychology of engagement with everyday life. New York: Basic Books.

Donaldson, S. I., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Nakamura, J. (2011). Applied positive psychology: Improving everyday life, health, schools, work, and society. New York: Psychology Press.

Greenberg, H. M., & Maymin, S. (2013). Profit from the positive: Proven leadership strategies to boost productivity and transform your business. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Levak, R. W., Siegel, L., & Nichols, S. N. (2011). Therapeutic feedback with the MMPI-2: A positive psychology approach. London: Taylor & Francis.

McCullough, M. (2008). Beyond revenge: The evolution of the forgiveness instinct. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Niemiec, R. M., & Wedding, D. (2013). Positive psychology at the movies: Using films to build character strengths and well-being (2nd ed.). Boston: Hogrefe.

Post, S., & Neimark, J. (2007). Why good things happen to good people. New York: Random House.

Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2017). Self-determination theory: Basic psychological needs in motivation, development, and wellness. New York: Guilford Press.

Papers and Journals

Selective Studies Bibliography (By Session)

Session One: Positive Introduction and Gratitude Journal

Lyubomirsky, S., Sousa, L., & Dickerhoof, R. (2006). The costs and benefits of writing, talking, and thinking about life’s triumphs and defeats. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 692–708.

McLean, K. C., Pasupathi, M., & Pals, J. L. (2007). Selves creating stories creating selves: A process model of self-development. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 11(3), 262–278. https://doi.org/10.1177/1088868307301034

McLean, K. C., Pratt, M. W., McLean, K. C., & Pratt, M. W. (2006). Life’s little (and big) lessons: Identity statuses and meaning-making in the turning point narratives of emerging adults. Developmental Psychology, 42(4), 714–722. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.42.4.714

Reiter, C., & Gabriele Wilz, G. (2015). Resource diary: A positive writing intervention for promoting well-being and preventing depression in adolescence. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 11(1), 99–108. doi:10.1080/17439760.2015.1025423

Ryan, C., Amorim, A. C., & Kusch, J. (2010). Writing ourselves reflectively. Reflective Practice, 11(2), 115–125.

Teske, J. A. (2017). Knowing ourselves by telling stories to ourselves. Zygon, 52(3), 880–902.

Session Two: Character Strengths and Signature Strengths

Charles, S. T. (2010). Strength and vulnerability integration: A model of emotional well-being across adulthood. Psychological Bulletin, 136(6), 1068–1091. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0021232

Macaskill, A., & Denovan, A. (2014). Assessing psychological health: The contribution of psychological strengths. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 42(3), 320–337. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03069885.2014.898739

Martínez-Martí, M. L., & Ruch, W. (2017). Character strengths predict resilience over and above positive affect, self-efficacy, optimism, social support, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 12(2), 110–119. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2016.1163403

Peterson, C., Park, N., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2006). Greater strengths of character and recovery from illness. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1, 17–26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439760500372739

Shoshani, A., & Slone, M. (2016). The resilience function of character strengths in the face of war and protracted conflict. Frontiers in Psychology, 6. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.02006

Vertilo, V., & Gibson, J. M. (2014). Influence of character strengths on mental health stigma. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(3), 266–275. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2014.891245

Young, K. C., Kashdan, T. B., & Macatee, R. (2014). Strength balance and implicit strength measurement: New considerations for research on strengths of character. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 10(1), 17–24.

Session Three: Practical Wisdom

Aisenberg, E. (2008). Evidence-based practice in mental health care to ethnic minority communities: Has its practice fallen short of its evidence? Social Work, 53(4), 297–306.

Cantrell, D. J., & Sharpe, K. (2016). Practicing practical wisdom. Mercer Law Review, 67(2), 331.

Cooke, S., & Carr, D. (2014). Virtue, practical wisdom and character in teaching. British Journal of Educational Studies, 62(2), 91–110.

Eriksen, K. Å., Dahl, H., Karlsson, B., & Arman, M. (2014). Strengthening practical wisdom: Mental health workers’ learning and development. Nursing Ethics, 21(6), 707–719.

Hurst, D. K. (2012). Practical wisdom: Reinventing organizations by rediscovering ourselves. Management Research Review, 36(8), 759–766.

Marshall, A., & Thorburn, M. (2014). Cultivating practical wisdom as education. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 46(14), 1553–1553.

Patrick, B. W., Heather, H. M., Kontra, C., Howard, C. N., & Hoeckner, B. (2016). The relationship between mental and somatic practices and wisdom. PLoS One, 11(2), e0149369.

Session Four: A Better Version of Me

Cox, K., & McAdams, D. (2012). The transforming self: Service narratives and identity change in emerging adulthood. Journal of Adolescent Research, 27(1), 18–43. doi:10.1177/0743558410384732

Glück, J., & Baltes, P. B. (2006). Using the concept of wisdom to enhance the expression of wisdom knowledge: Not the philosopher’s dream but differential effects of developmental preparedness. Psychology and Aging, 21, 679–690.

King, L. A. (2001). The health benefits of writing about life goals. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27, 798–807.

Lavy, S., & Littman-Ovadia, H. (2017). My better self. Journal of Career Development, 44(2), 95–109. https://doi.org/10.1177/0894845316634056

Meevissen, Y. M. C., Peters, M. L., & Alberts, H. J. E. M. (2011). Become more optimistic by imagining a best possible self: Effects of a two-week intervention. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 42, 371–378.

Peters, M. L., Flink, I. K., Boersma, K., & Linton, S. J. (2010). Manipulating optimism: Can imagining a best possible self be used to increase positive future expectancies? The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(3), 204–211. doi:10.1080/17439761003790963

Renner, F., Schwarz, P., Peters, M. L., & Huibers, M. J. H. (2016). Effects of a best-possible-self mental imagery exercise on mood and dysfunctional attitudes. Psychiatry Research, 215(1), 105–110.

Schwartz, B., & Sharpe, K. E. (2006). Practical wisdom: Aristotle meets positive psychology. Journal of Happiness Studies, 7, 377.

Session Five: Open and Closed Memories

Andreassen, T. W. (2001). From disgust to delight: Do customers hold a grudge? Journal of Service Research, 4(1), 39–49.

Ayduk, Ö., & Kross, E. (2010). From a distance: Implications of spontaneous self-distancing for adaptive self-reflection. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98(5), 809–829. doi:10.1037/a0019205

Hofmann, S. G., Wu, J. Q., & Boettcher, H. (2013). D-cycloserine for treating anxiety disorders: Making good exposures better and bad exposures worse. Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, 3(11). www.biolmoodanxietydisord.com/content/3/1/11

Huffziger, S., & Kuehner, C. (2009). Rumination, distraction, and mindful self-focus in depressed patients. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 47(3), 224–230. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2008.12.005

Joormann, J., Hertel, P. T., Brozovich, F., & Gotlib, I. H. (2005). Remembering the good, forgetting the bad: Intentional forgetting of emotional material in depression. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 114(4), 640–648. doi:10.1037/0021-843X.114.4.640

Lavy, S., Littman-Ovadia, H., & Bareli, Y. (2014). Strengths deployment as a mood-repair mechanism: Evidence from a diary study with a relationship exercise group. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(6), 547–558.

Rusting, C. L., & DeHart, T. (2000). Retrieving positive memories to regulate negative mood: Consequences for mood-congruent memory. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 737–752. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.78.4.737

Woodworth, R. J., O’Brien‐Malone, A., Diamond, M. R., & Schüz, B. (2017). Web‐based positive psychology interventions: A reexamination of effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 73(3), 218–232.

Session Six: Forgiveness

Akhtar, S., Dolan, A., & Barlow, J. (2017). Understanding the relationship between state forgiveness and psychological wellbeing: A qualitative study. Journal of Religion and Health, 56(2), 450–463.

Hanke, K., & Fischer, R. (2013). Socioeconomical and sociopolitical correlates of interpersonal forgiveness: A three‐level meta‐analysis of the Enright Forgiveness Inventory across 13 societies. International Journal of Psychology, 48(4), 514–526.

Kekes, J. (2009). Blame versus forgiveness. The Monist, 92(4), 488–506.

McCullough, M. E., Kurzban, R., & Tabak, B. A. (2013). Cognitive systems for revenge and forgiveness. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 36(1), 1–15.

McCullough, M. E., Root, L. M., & Cohen, A. D. (2006). Writing about the benefits of an interpersonal transgression facilitates forgiveness. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74(5), 887–897.

Menahem, S., & Love, M. (2013). Forgiveness in psychotherapy: The key to healing. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69(8), 829–835.

Session Seven: Maximizing versus Satisficing

Michail, D. K. (2017). When the purpose lies within: Maximizers and satisfaction with autotelic choices. Marketing Letters, 7, 1–13.

Moulding, R., Duong, A., Nedeljkovic, M., & Kyrios, M. (2017). Do you think that money can buy happiness? A review of the role of mood, materialism, self, and cognitions in compulsive buying. Current Addiction Reports, 4(3), 254–261.

Newman, D. B., Schug, J., Yuki, M., Yamada, J., & Nezlek, J. B. (2017). The negative consequences of maximizing in friendship selection. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 114(5), 804–824.

Schwartz, B., Ben-Haim, Y., & Dasco, C. (2011). What makes a good decision? Robust satisficing as a normative standard of rational decision making. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, 41(2), 209–227.

Stanhope, V., Barrenger, S. L., Salzer, M. S., & Marcus, S. C. (2013). Examining the relationship between choice, therapeutic alliance and outcomes in mental health services. Journal of Personalized Medicine, 3(3), 191–202.

Zemojtel-Piotrowska, M., Baran, T., Clinton, A., Piotrowski, J., Baltatescu, S., & Alain, V. H. (2013). Materialism, subjective well-being, and entitlement. Journal of Social Research & Policy, 4(2), 79.

Session Eight: Gratitude

Carson, J., Muir, M., Clark, S., Wakely, E., & Chander, A. (2010). Piloting a gratitude intervention in a community mental health team. Groupwork, 20(3), 73–87.

Costa, K. (2018). Discover 5 ways to develop a gratitude practice. Student Affairs Today, 20(12), 7.

Elosúa, M. R. (2015). The influence of gratitude in physical, psychological, and spiritual well-being. Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health, 17(2), 110.

Froh, J. J., Kashdan, T. B., Ozimkowski, K. M., & Miller, N. (2009). Who benefits the most from a gratitude intervention in children and adolescents? Examining positive affect as a moderator. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4(5), 408–422; doi:10.1080/17439760902992464

Kardas, F., & Yalcin, I. (2018). Gratitude: A current issue in mental health. Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar, 10(1), 1–18.

Kerr, S. L., O’Donovan, A., & Pepping, C. A. (2015). Can gratitude and kindness interventions enhance well-being in a clinical sample? Journal of Happiness Studies, 16(1), 17–36.

Lanham, M., Rye, M., Rimsky, L., & Weill, S. (2012). How gratitude relates to burnout and job satisfaction in mental health professionals. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 34(4), 341–354.

Loo, J. M. Y., Jung-Shun, T., Raylu, N., & Oei, T. P. S. (2014). Gratitude, hope, mindfulness and personal-growth initiative: Buffers or risk factors for problem gambling? PLoS One, 9(2), e83889.

Ramírez, E., Ortega, A. R., Chamorro, A., & Colmenero, J. M. (2014). A program of positive intervention in the elderly: Memories, gratitude and forgiveness. Aging & Mental Health, 18(4), 463–470.

Session Nine: Hope and Optimism

Alarcon, G. M., Bowling, N. A., & Khazon, S. (2013). Great expectations: A meta-analytic examination of optimism and hope. Personality and Individual Differences, 54(7), 821–827.

Caprara, G. V., Steca, P., Alessandri, G., Abela, J. R., & McWhinnie, C. M. (2010). Positive orientation: Explorations on what is common to life satisfaction, self-esteem, and optimism. Epidemiologia E Psichiatria Sociale, 19, 63–71.

Chen, J., Zhou, X., Zeng, M., & Wu, X. (2015). Post-traumatic stress symptoms and post-traumatic growth: Evidence from a longitudinal study following an earthquake disaster. PLoS One, 10(6), E0127241.

Dohrenwend, B. P., Neria, Y., Turner, B. J., Turse, N., Marshall, R., Lewis-Fernandez, R., & Koenen, K. C. (2004). Positive tertiary appraisals and posttraumatic stress disorder in U.S. male veterans of the war in Vietnam: The roles of positive affirmation, positive reformulation, and defensive denial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72, 417–433.

Giltay, E. J., Geleijnse, J. M., Zitman, F. G., Hoekstra, T., & Schouten, E. G. (2004). Dispositional optimism and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a prospective cohort of elderly Dutch men and women. Archives of General Psychiatry, 61, 1126–1135.

Grad, R. I., & Zeligman, M. (2017). Predictors of post-traumatic growth: The role of social interest and meaning in life. The Journal of Individual Psychology, 73(3), 190–207.

Mangelsdorf, J., & Eid, M. (2015). What makes a thriver? Unifying the concepts of post-traumatic and post-ecstatic growth. Frontiers in Psychology, 6.

Olga, O. T. (2017). Bereavement, post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth: Through the lenses of positive psychology. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 8, 1.

Powell, T., Gilson, R., & Collin, C. (2012). TBI 13 years on: Factors associated with post-traumatic growth. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(17), 1461–1467.

Rizkalla, N., & Segal, S. P. (2018). Well‐being and posttraumatic growth among Syrian refugees in Jordan. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 31(2), 213–222.

Rozentsvit, I. (2016). The post-traumatic growth: The wisdom of the mind, its clinical and neuropsychoanalytic vicissitudes. European Psychiatry, 33, S568.

Ruini, C., Vescovelli, F., & Albieri, E. (2013). Post-traumatic growth in breast cancer survivors: New insights into its relationships with well-being and distress. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 20(3), 383–391.

Ryff, C. D. (2014). Self-realisation and meaning making in the face of adversity: A eudaimonic approach to human resilience. Journal of Psychology in Africa, 24(1), 1.

Schiavon, C. C., Marchetti, E., Gurgel, L., Busnello, F. M., & Reppold, C. T. (2017). Optimism and hope in chronic disease: A systematic review. Frontiers in Psychology, 7.

Shapira, L. B., & Mongrain, M. (2010). The benefits of self-compassion and optimism exercises for individuals vulnerable to depression. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5, 377–389.

Session Ten: Posttraumatic Growth

Emmons, R. A., & McCullough, M. E. (2003). Counting blessings versus burdens: An experimental investigation of gratitude and subjective well-being in daily life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 377–389.

Moore, M. M., Cerel, J., & Jobes, D. A. (2015). Fruits of trauma? Posttraumatic growth among suicide-bereaved parents. Crisis, 36(4), 241–248.

Tedeschi, R. G., & McNally, R. J. (2011). Can we facilitate posttraumatic growth in combat veterans? American Psychologist, 66, 19–24.

Watkins, P. C., Grimm, D. L., & Kolts, R. (2004). Counting your blessings: Positive memories among grateful persons. Current Psychology, 23, 52–67.

Session Eleven: Slowness and Savoring

Slowness

Bawden, D., & Robinson, L. (2009). The dark side of information: Overload, anxiety and other paradoxes and pathologies. Journal of Information Science, 35(2), 180–191.

Corbin, A., & Paquot, T. (2005). The art of idleness: Work . . . but only if you must: A philosophical dialogue. Queen’s Quarterly, 112(3), 430.

Hutchings, K. (2011). What is orientation in thinking? On the question of time and timeliness in cosmopolitical thought. Constellations, 18(2), 190–204.

Knox, P. (2005). Creating ordinary places: Slow cities in a fast world. Journal of Urban Design, 10(1), 1–11.

Mayer, H., & Knox, P. L. (2006). Slow cities: Sustainable places in a fast world. Journal of Urban Affairs, 28(4), 321–334. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9906.2006.00298.x

Savoring

Black, I. R., & Areni, C. S. (2016). Anticipatory savoring and consumption: Just thinking about that first bite of chocolate fills you up faster. Psychology & Marketing, 33(7), 516–524.

Brewer, T. (2003). Savoring time: Desire, pleasure and wholehearted activity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, 6(2), 143–160.

Bryant, F. B., & Veroff, J (1984). Dimensions of subjective mental health in American men and women. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 25, 116–135.

Cassar, R., Applegate, E., & Bentall, R. P. (2013). Poor savouring and low self-efficacy are predictors of anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Psychiatry Research, 210(3), 830–834.

Ivtzan, I., Young, T., Martman, J., Jeffrey, A., Lomas, T., Hart, R., et al. (2016). Integrating mindfulness into positive psychology: A randomised controlled trial of an online positive mindfulness program. Mindfulness, 7(6), 1396–1407.

Kashdan, T. B., Yarbro, J., McKnight, P. E., & Nezlek, J. B. (2014). Laughter with someone else leads to future social rewards: Temporal change using experience sampling methodology. Personality and Individual Differences, 58, 15–19.

Kiken, L. G., Lundberg, K. B., & Fredrickson, B. L. (2017). Being present and enjoying it: Dispositional mindfulness and savoring the moment are distinct, interactive predictors of positive emotions and psychological health. Mindfulness, 8(5), 1280–1290. doi:10.1007/s12671-017-0704-3

Quoidbach, J., Berry, E., Hansenne, M., & Mikolajczak, M. (2010). Positive emotion regulation and wellbeing: Comparing the impact of eight savoring and dampening strategies. Personality and Individual Differences, 49, 368–373.

Session Twelve: Positive Relationships

Algoe, S., Gable, S. L., & Maisel, N. C. (2010). It’s the little things: Everyday gratitude as a booster shot for romantic relationships. Personal Relationships, 17(2), 217–233. doi:10.1111/j.1475-6811.2010.01273.x

Cacioppo, J. T., Hawkley, L. C., Kalil, A., Hughes, M. E., Waite, L., & Thisted, R. A. (2008). Happiness and the invisible threads of social connection: The Chicago Health, Aging, and Social Relations Study. In Michael Eid & R. L. Larsen (Eds.), The science of well-being (pp. 195–219). New York: Guilford Press.

Conoley, C. W., Plumb, E. W., Hawley, K. J., Spaventa-Vancil, K., & Hernández, R. J. (2015). Integrating positive psychology into family therapy: Positive family therapy. The Counseling Psychologist, 43(5), 703–733.

Ho, H. C. Y., Mui, M., Wan, A., Ng, Y., Stewart, S. M., Yew, C., . . . Chan, S. S. (2016). Happy family kitchen II: A cluster randomized controlled trial of a community-based positive psychology family intervention for subjective happiness and health-related quality of life in Hong Kong. Trials, 17(1), 367.

Kashdan, T. B., Blalock, D. V., Young, K. C., Machell, K. A., Monfort, S. S., McKnight, P. E., & Ferssizidis, P. (2018). Personality strengths in romantic relationships: Measuring perceptions of benefits and costs and their impact on personal and relational well-being. Psychological Assessment, 30(2), 241–258. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0000464

Lambert, N. M., Stillman, T. F., Baumeister, R. F., Fincham, F. R., Hicks, J. A., & Graham, S. M. (2010). Family as a salient source of meaning in young adulthood. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5, 367–376.

Lavy, S., Littman-Ovadia, H., & Bareli, Y. (2014). Strengths deployment as a mood-repair mechanism: Evidence from a diary study with a relationship exercise group. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(6), 547–558.

Lavy, S., Littman-Ovadia, H., & Bareli, Y. (2016). My better half. Journal of Family Issues, 37(12), 1730–1745. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X14550365

Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Gottfried, A. E., Delany, D. E., & Ibrahim, S. M. (2016). Positive family relationships: Longitudinal network of relations. Journal of Family Psychology, 30(7), 875–885.

Sexton, T. L., & Schuster, R. A. (2008). The role of positive emotion in the therapeutic process of family therapy. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 18(2), 233–247.

Session Thirteen: Positive Communication

Algoe, S., Haidt, J., & Gable, S. L. (2008). Beyond reciprocity: Gratitude and relationships in everyday life. Emotion, 8, 425–429.

Gable S. L., Gosnell C. L., Maisel, N. C., & Strachman, A. (2012). Safely testing the alarm: Close others’ responses to personal positive events. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 103, 963.

Gable, S. L., & Reis, H. T. (2010). Good news! Capitalizing on positive events in an interpersonal context. In M. P. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (vol. 42, pp. 195–257). San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press.

Kok, B. E., Coffey, K. A., Cohn, M. A., Catalino, L. I., Vacharkulksemsuk, T., Algoe, S. B., . . . Fredrickson, B. L. (2013). How positive emotions build physical health: Perceived positive social connections account for the upward spiral between positive emotions and vagal tone. Psychological Science, 24, 1123–1132.

Maisel, N. C., & Gable, S. L. (2009). The paradox of received support: The importance of responsiveness. Psychological Science, 20, 928–932.

Session Fourteen: Altruism

Carlile, J. A., Mauseth, K., Clark, N. E., Cruz, J. L., & Thoburn, J. W. (2014). Local volunteerism and resilience following large-scale disaster: Outcomes for health support team volunteers in Haiti. International Journal of Disaster Risk Science, 5(3), 206–213.

Dulin, P. L., Gavala, J., Stephens, C., Kostick, M., & McDonald, J. (2012). Volunteering predicts happiness among older Māori and non-Māori in the New Zealand Health, Work, and Retirement Longitudinal Study. Aging & Mental Health, 16(5), 617–624.

Gilster, M. E. (2012). Comparing neighborhood‐focused activism and volunteerism: Psychological well‐being and social connectedness. Journal of Community Psychology, 40(7), 769–784.

Jenkinson, C. E., Dickens, A. P., Jones, K., Thompson-Coon, J., Taylor, R. S., Rogers, M., . . . Richards, S. H. (2013). Is volunteering a public health intervention? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the health and survival of volunteers. BMC Public Health, 13(1), 773.

Kranke, D., Weiss, E. L., Heslin, K. C., & Dobalian, A. (2017). “We are disaster response experts”: A qualitative study on the mental health impact of volunteering in disaster settings among combat veterans. Social Work in Public Health, 32(8), 500.

Li, Y., & Ferraro, K. F. (2006). Volunteering in middle and later life: Is health a benefit, barrier or both? Social Forces, 85(1), 497–519.

Littman-Ovadia, H., & Steger, M. (2010): Character strengths and well-being among volunteers and employees: Toward an integrative model, The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(6), 419–430.

O’Brien, L., Burls, A., Townsend, M., & Ebden, M. (2011). Volunteering in nature as a way of enabling people to reintegrate into society. Perspectives in Public Health, 131(2), 71.

Rogers, N. T., Demakakos, P., Taylor, M. S., Steptoe, A., Hamer, M., & Shankar, A. (2016). Volunteering is associated with increased survival in able-bodied participants of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 70(6), 583–588.

Tabassum, F., Mohan, J., & Smith, P. (2016). Association of volunteering with mental well-being: A lifecourse analysis of a national population-based longitudinal study in the UK. BMJ Open, 6(8), e011327.

Weinstein, N., & Ryan, R. M. (2010). When helping helps: Autonomous motivation for prosocial behavior and its influence on well-being for the helper and recipient. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98(2), 222–244.

Session Fifteen: Meaning and Purpose

Harzer, C., & Ruch, W. (2012). When the job is a calling: The role of applying one’s signature strengths at work. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 7(5), 362–371.

Hibberd, R. (2013). Meaning reconstruction in bereavement: Sense and significance. Death Studies, 37(7), 670–692.

Joo, Y. S., & Michael, F. S. (2016). Supportive college environment for meaning searching and meaning in life among American college students. Journal of College Student Development, 57(1), 18.

Krause, N. (2009). Meaning in life and mortality. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 64(4), 517–527.

Oman, D., Thoresen, C., & McMahon, K. (1999). Volunteerism and mortality among the community-dwelling elderly. Journal of Health Psychology, 4, 301–316.

Routledge, C., Abeyta, A. A., & Roylance, C. (2017). We are not alone: The meaning motive, religiosity, and belief in extraterrestrial intelligence. Motivation and Emotion, 41(2), 135–146.

Steger, M. F., & Shin, J. Y. (2010). The relevance of the meaning in life questionnaire to therapeutic practice: A look at the initial evidence. International Forum for Logotherapy, 33(2), 95–104.

Stillman, T. F., & Baumeister, R. F. (2009). Uncertainty, belongingness, and four needs for meaning. Psychological Inquiry, 20, 249–251.

Wright, M. O., Crawford, E., & Sebastian, K. (2007). Positive resolution of childhood sexual abuse experiences: The role of coping, benefit-finding and meaning-making. Journal of Family Violence, 22(7), 597–608.

Wrzesniewski, A., McCauley, C., Rozin, P., & Schwartz, B. (1997). Jobs, careers, and callings: People’s relations to their work. Journal of Research in Personality, 31, 21–33.

Yeager, D. S., Henderson, M. D., Paunesku, D., Walton, G. M., D’Mello, S., Spitzer, B. J., . . . Duckworth, A. L. (2014). Boring but important: A self-transcendent purpose for learning fosters academic self-regulation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 107(4), 559–580.

Positive Interventions

Bell, C. M., Davis, D. E., Griffin, B. J., Ashby, J. S., & Rice, K. G. (2017). The promotion of self-forgiveness, responsibility, and willingness to make reparations through a workbook intervention. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 12(6), 571–578.

Bolier, L., Haverman, M., Westerhof, G. J., Riper, H., Smit, F., & Bohlmeijer, E. (2013). Positive psychology interventions: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies. BMC Public Health, 13, 119. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-119

Drozd, F., Mork, L., Nielsen, B., Raeder, S., & Bjørkli, C. A. (2014). Better Days—A randomized controlled trial of an Internet-based positive psychology intervention. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(5), 377–388. doi:10.1080/17439760.2014.910822

DuBois, C. M., Beach, S. R., Kashdan, T. B., Nyer, M. B., Park, Elyse R., . . . Huffman, J. C. (2012). Positive psychological attributes and cardiac outcomes: Associations, mechanisms, and interventions. Psychosomatics, 53(4), 303–318.

Forehand, R., Thigpen, J. C., Parent, J., Hardcastle, E. J., Bettis, A., & Compas, B. E. (2012). The role of parent depressive symptoms in positive and negative parenting in a preventive intervention. Journal of Family Psychology, 26(4), 532–541.

Ghielen, S. T. S., van Woerkom, M., & Meyers, M. C. (2017). Promoting positive outcomes through strengths interventions: A literature review. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 1–13.

Giannopoulos, V. L., & Vella-Brodrick, D. (2011). Effects of positive interventions and orientations to happiness on subjective well-being. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 6, 95–105. doi:10.1080/17439760.2010.545428

Ho, H. C. Y., Mui, M., Wan, A., Stewart, S. M., Yew, C., . . . Chan, S. S. (2017). Happy family kitchen: Behavioral outcomes of a brief community-based family intervention in Hong Kong. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 26(10), 2852–2864.

Ho, H. C. Y., Yeung, D. Y., & Kwok, S. Y. C. L. (2014). Development and evaluation of the positive psychology intervention for older adults. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(3), 187–197. doi:10.1080/17439760.2014.888577

Layous, K., Chancellor, J., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2014). Positive activities as protective factors against mental health conditions. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 123(1), 3–12.

Martínez-Martí, M. L., Avia, M. D., & Hernández-Lloreda, M. J. (2014). Appreciation of beauty training: A web-based intervention. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(6), 477–481.

Meerman, E. E., Brosschot, J. F., & Verkuil, B. (2013). The effects of a positive health priming intervention on somatic complaints. Psychology & Health, 28(2), 189–201.

Meyer, P. S., Johnson, D. P., Parks, A., Iwanski, C., & Penn, D. L. (2012). Positive living: A pilot study of group positive psychotherapy for people with schizophrenia. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 7(3), 239–248.

Mongrain, M., & Anselmo-Matthews, T. (2012). Do positive psychology exercises work? A replication of Seligman et al. (2005). Journal of Clinical Psychology, 68(4), 382–389.

Proyer, R. T., Ruch, W., & Buschor, C. (2012). Testing strengths-based interventions: A preliminary study on the effectiveness of a program targeting curiosity, gratitude, hope, humor, and zest for enhancing life satisfaction. Journal of Happiness Studies, 14(1), 275–292. doi:10.1007/s10902-012-9331-9

Proyer, R. T., Wellenzohn, S., Gander, F., & Ruch, W. (2015). Toward a better understanding of what makes positive psychology interventions work: Predicting happiness and depression from the person × intervention fit in a follow-up after 3.5 years. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, 7(1), 108–128. doi:10.1111/aphw.12039

Quinlan, D., Swain, N., & Vella-Brodrick, D. A. (2012). Character strengths interventions: Building on what we know for improved outcomes. Journal of Happiness Studies, 13(6), 1145–1163.

Schotanus-Dijkstra, M., Drossaert, C. H., Pieterse, M. E., Walburg, J. A., & Bohlmeijer, E. T. (2015). Efficacy of a multicomponent positive psychology self-help intervention: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial. JMIR Research Protocols, 4(3), e105. http://doi.org/10.2196/resprot.4162

Shoshani, A., & Steinmetz, S. (2014). Positive psychology at school: A school-based intervention to promote adolescents’ mental health and well-being. Journal of Happiness Studies, 15(6), 1289–1311. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-013-9476-1

Tolan, P. (2014). Future directions for positive development intervention research. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 43(4), 686–694.

Waters, L. (2011). A review of school-based positive psychology interventions. The Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, 28(2), 75–90. http://dx.doi.org/10.1375/aedp.28.2.75

Woodworth, R. J., O’Brien-Malone, A., Diamond, M. R., & Schuz, B. (2016). Web-based positive psychology interventions: A reexamination of effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 73(3), 218–232. doi:10.1002/jclp.22328

Positive Interventions

Baños, R. M., Etchemendy, E., Mira, A., Riva, G., Gaggioli, A., & Botella, C. (2017). Online positive interventions to promote well-being and resilience in the adolescent population: A narrative review. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 8.

Chaves, C., Vázquez, C., & Hervás, G. (2016). Positive interventions in seriously-ill children: Effects on well-being after granting a wish. Journal of Health Psychology, 21(9), 1870–1883.

Ghosh, A., & Deb, A. (2017). Positive psychology interventions for chronic physical illnesses: A systematic review. Psychological Studies, 62(3), 213–232.

Hervás, G. (2017). The limits of positive interventions. Papeles Del Psicologo, 38(1), 42–49.

Khazaei, F., Khazaei, O., & Ghanbari-H, B. (2017). Positive psychology interventions for internet addiction treatment. Computers in Human Behavior, 72, 304–311.

Sosik, V. S., & Cosley, D. (2014). Leveraging social media content to support engagement in positive interventions. Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(5), 428–434.

Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical/Counseling Psychology (General Overviews)

Ahmed, M., & Boisvert, C. M. (2006). Using positive psychology with special mental health populations. American Psychologist, 61(4), 333–335. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.61.4.333

Carl, J. R., Soskin, D. P., Kerns, C., & Barlow, D. H. (2013). Positive emotion regulation in emotional disorders: A theoretical review. Clinical Psychology Review, 33(3), 343–360. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2013.01.003

Duckworth, A. L., Steen, T. A., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2005). Positive psychology in clinical practice. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 1, 629–651.

Frazier, P. A., Lee, R. M., & Steger, M. F. (2006). What can counseling psychology contribute to the study of optimal human functioning? The Counseling Psychologist, 34, 293–303.

Hall-Simmonds, A., & McGrath, R. E. (2017). Character strengths and clinical presentation. The Journal of Positive Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2017.1365160

Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Positive clinical psychology: A new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 819–829.

Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Settings (Specific Topics)

Duan, W., & Samuel, M. Y. H. (2018). Does being mindful of your character strengths enhance psychological wellbeing? A longitudinal mediation analysis. Journal of Happiness Studies, 19(4), 1045–1066.

Huffman, J. C., DuBois, C. M., Millstein, R. A., Celano, C. M., & Wexler, D. (2015). Positive psychological interventions for patients with type 2 diabetes: Rationale, theoretical model, and intervention development. Journal of Diabetes Research, 2015, 428349. doi:10.1155/2015/428349

Lopez, S. J., Magyar-Moe, J. L., Petersen, S. E., Ryder, J. A., Krieshok, T. S., O’Byrne, K. K., . . . Fry, N. A. (2006). Counseling psychology’s focus on positive aspects of human functioning. The Counseling Psychologist, 34, 205–227.

Maddux, J. E. (2008). Positive psychology and the illness ideology: Toward a positive clinical psychology. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 57(Suppl 1), 54–70. doi:10.1111/j.1464-0597.2008.00354.x

O’Connor, P. J., Herring, M. P., & Caravalho, A. (2010). Mental health benefits of strength training in adults. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE.

Rashid, T. (2009). Positive interventions in clinical practice. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 65, 461–466.

Rashid, T. (2013). Positive in practice: Positive psychotherapy. In S. David, I. Boniwell, & A. C. Ayers (Eds.), Oxford handbook of happiness (pp. 978–993). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rashid, T. (2015). Positive psychotherapy: A strength-based approach. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 10(1), 25–40. doi:10.1080/17439760.2014.920411

Rashid, T., & Anjum, A. (2008). Positive psychotherapy for young adults and children. In J. R. Z. Abela & B. L. Hankin (Eds.), Handbook of depression in children and adolescents (pp. 250–287). New York: Guilford Press.

Rashid, T., Anjum, A., Chu, R., Stevanovski, S., Zanjani, A., & Lennex, C. (2014). Strength based resilience: Integrating risk and resources towards holistic wellbeing. In G. A. Fava & C. Ruini (Eds.), Increasing psychological well-being across cultures (pp. 153–176). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Rashid, T., Howes, R., & Louden, R. (2017). Positive psychotherapy. In M. Slad, L. Oades, & A. Jarden (Eds.). Wellbeing, recovery and mental health (pp. 112–132). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rashid, T., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2018). Positive psychotherapy. In D. Wedding & R. J. Corsini (Eds.), Current psychotherapies, 11th ed. (pp. 481–526). Belmont, CA: Cengage.

Rashid, T., Summers, R. F., & Seligman, M. E. P. (in press). Positive psychology. In A. Tasman, J. Kay, J. A. Lieberman, M. B. First, & M. Riba (Eds.), Psychiatry (4th ed.). New York: Wiley.

Ryff, C. D., & Singer, B. (1996). Psychological well-being: Meaning, measurement, and implications for psychotherapy research. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 65, 14–23.

Seligman, M. E. P., Rashid, T., & Parks, A. C. (2006). Positive psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 61, 774–788.

Seligman, M. E. P., Steen, T. A., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2005). Positive psychology progress: Empirical validation of interventions. American Psychologist, 60, 410–421.

Sin, N. L., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2009). Enhancing well-being and alleviating depressive symptoms with positive psychology interventions: A practice-friendly meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session, 65, 467–487.

Smith, E. J. (2006). The strength-based counseling model. The Counseling Psychologist, 34, 13–79.

Uliaszek, A. A., Rashid, T., Williams, G. E., & Gulamani, T. (2016). Group therapy for university students: A randomized control trial of dialectical behavior therapy and positive psychotherapy. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 77, 78–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2015.12.003

Vella-Brodrick, D. A., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2009). Three ways to be happy: Pleasure, engagement, and meaning. Findings from Australian and US samples. Social Indicators Research, 90, 165–179.

Wong, Y. J. (2006). Strength-centered therapy: A social constructionist, virtues-based psychotherapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 43, 133–146.

Integration of Positive Psychology with Other Approaches

Carr, A., & Finnegan, L. (2015). The say “yes” to life (SYTL) program: A positive psychology group intervention for depression. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, 45(2), 109–118.

Cope, T. A. (2010). The inherently integrative approach of positive psychotherapy. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 20(2), 203–250. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0019769

Fava, G. A., & Ruini, C. (2003). Development and characteristics of a well-being enhancing psychotherapeutic strategy: Well-being therapy. Journal of Behaviour Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 34, 45–63.

Karwoski, L., Garratt, G. M., & Ilardi, S. S. (2006). On the integration of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression and positive psychology. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 20(2), 159–170. doi:10.1891/jcop.20.2.159

Lopez‐Gomez, I., Chaves, C., Hervas, G., & Vazquez, C. (2017). Comparing the acceptability of a positive psychology intervention versus a cognitive behavioural therapy for clinical depression. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 24(5), 1029–1039.

Keyes, C. L. (2005). Mental illness and/or mental health? Investigating axioms of the complete state model of health. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 73, 539–548.

Mak, V. W. M., & Chan, C. K. Y. (2018). Effects of cognitive‐behavioural therapy (CBT) and positive psychological intervention (PPI) on female offenders with psychological distress in Hong Kong. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 28(2), 158–173.

Moeenizadeh, M., & Salagame, K. K. K. (2010). Well-being therapy (WBT) for depression. International Journal of Psychological Studies, 2(1), 107–115.

Philipp, P. V., Teismann, T., & Willutzki, U. (2017). A pilot evaluation of a strengths-based CBT intervention module with college students. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 45(4), 427.

Sexton, T. L., & Schuster, R. A. (2008). The role of positive emotion in the therapeutic process of family therapy. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 18(2), 233–247.

Selective Studies Bibliography (by Specific Disorder)

Addiction

Akhtar, M., & Boniwell, I. (2010). Applying positive psychology to alcohol-misusing adolescents: A group intervention. Groupwork, 20(3), 6–31.

Khazaei, F., Khazaei, O., & Ghanbari-H., B. (2017). Positive psychology interventions for Internet addiction treatment. Computers in Human Behavior, 72, 304.

Krentzman, A. R. (2013). Review of the application of positive psychology to substance abuse use, addiction, and recovery research. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 27(1), 151–165. doi:10.1037/a0029897

Krentzman, A. R., & Barker, S. L. (2016). Counselors’ perspectives of positive psychology for the treatment of addiction: A mixed methods pilot study. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 34(4), 370–385.

Logan, D. E., Kilmer, J. R., & Marlatt, G. A. (2010). The virtuous drinker: Character virtues as correlates and moderators of college student drinking and consequences. Journal of American College Health, 58, 317–324.

Anxiety and Social Anxiety

Cohen, J. N., & Dryman, M. T. (2017). Positive and negative affect as links between social anxiety and depression: Predicting concurrent and prospective mood symptoms in unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. Behavior Therapy, 48(6), 820.

Dryman, M. T., Gardner, S., Weeks, J. W., & Heimberg, R. G. (2015). Social anxiety disorder and quality of life: How fears of negative and positive evaluation relate to specific domains of life satisfaction. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 38, 1–8.

Ruini, C., & Fava, G. A. (2009). Well-being therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 65(5), 510–519. doi:10.1002/jclp.20592

Weeks, J. W., & Zoccola, P. M. (2015). “Having the heart to be evaluated”: The differential effects of fears of positive and negative evaluation on emotional and cardiovascular responses to social threat. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 36, 115.

Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder

Greven, C. U., Buitelaar, J. K., & Salum, G. A. (2018). From positive psychology to psychopathology: The continuum of attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 59(3), 203–212.

Borderline Personality Disorder

Uliaszek, A. A., Rashid, T., Williams, G. E., & Gulamani, T. (2016). Group therapy for university students: A randomized control trial of dialectical behavior therapy and positive psychotherapy. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 77, 78–85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2015.12.003

Depression

Edmondson, O. J. H., & MacLeod, A. K. (2015). Psychological well‐being and anticipated positive personal events: Their relationship to depression. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 22(5), 418–425.

Kwok, S. Y. C. L., Gu, M., & Kit, K. T. K. (2016). Positive psychology intervention to alleviate child depression and increase life satisfaction: A randomized clinical trial. Research on Social Work Practice, 26(4), 350–361.

Layous, K., Chancellor, J., Lyubomirsky, S., Wang, L., & Doraiswamy, P. M. (2011). Delivering happiness: Translating positive psychology intervention research for treating major and minor depressive disorders. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 17(8), 675–683.

Wood, A. M., & Joseph, S. (2010). The absence of positive psychological (eudemonic) well-being as a risk factor for depression: A ten year cohort study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 122(3), 213–217. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2009.06.032

Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Gillett, R., Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (2008). The role of gratitude in the development of social support, stress, and depression: Two longitudinal studies. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 854–871.

Narcissism and Personality Disorders

Ng, W. (2012). Neuroticism and well-being? Let’s work on the positive rather than negative aspects. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 7(5), 416–426. doi:10.1080/17439760.2012.709270

Zuckerman, M., & O’Loughlin, R. E. (2009). Narcissism and well‐being: A longitudinal perspective. European Journal of Social Psychology, 39(6), 957–972.

Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

Andrewes, H. E., Walker, V., & O’Neill, B. (2014). Exploring the use of positive psychology interventions in brain injury survivors with challenging behaviour. Brain Injury, 28(7), 965–971.

Bertisch, H., Rath, J., Long, C., Ashman, T., & Rashid, T. (2014). Positive psychology in rehabilitation medicine: A brief report. NeuroRehabilitation. doi:10.3233/NRE-141059

Psychosis

Drvaric, L., Gerritsen, C., Rashid, T., Bagby, R. M., & Mizrahi, R. (2015). High stress, low resilience in people at clinical high risk for psychosis: Should we consider a strengths-based approach? Canadian Psychology/Psychologie Canadienne, 56(3), 332–347. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cap0000035

Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., Taylor, P. J., Pratt, D., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Resilience to suicidal ideation in psychosis: Positive self-appraisals buffer the impact of hopelessness. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48(9), 883–889.

Jordan, G., Pope, M., Lambrou, A., Malla, A., & Iyer, S. (2017). Post‐traumatic growth following a first episode of psychosis: A scoping review. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 11(3), 187–199.

Meyer, P. S., Johnson, D. P., Parks, A. C., Iwanski, C. & Penn, D. L. (2012). Positive living: A pilot study of group positive psychotherapy for people with schizophrenia. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 7, 239–248.

Schrank, B., Riches, S., Coggins, T., Rashid, T., Tylee, A., Slade, M. (2014). WELLFOCUS PPT—modified positive psychotherapy to improve well-being in psychosis: Study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial. Trial, 15(1), 203.

Suicidal Ideation Behavior

Cantz, P., & Kaplan, K. (2017). Biblical narratives for positive psychology and suicide prevention: An evidence supported approach. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 20(7), 654.

Chang, E. C., Martos, T., Sallay, V., Chang, O. D., Wright, K. M., Najarian, A. S., & Lee, J. (2017). Examining optimism and hope as protective factors of suicide risk in Hungarian college students: Is risk highest among those lacking positive psychological protection? Cognitive Therapy and Research, 41(2), 278–288.

Huffman, J. C., DuBois, C. M., Healy, B. C., Boehm, J. K., Kashdan, T. B., Celano, C. M., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2014). Feasibility and utility of positive psychology exercises for suicidal inpatients. General Hospital Psychiatry, 36(1), 88–94.

Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Resilience as positive coping appraisals: Testing the schematic appraisals model of suicide (SAMS). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48(3), 179–186.

Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., Taylor, P. J., Pratt, D., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Resilience to suicidal ideation in psychosis: Positive self-appraisals buffer the impact of hopelessness. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48, 883–889.

Johnson, J., Wood, A. M., Gooding, P., Taylor, P. J., & Tarrier, N. (2011). Resilience to suicidality: The buffering hypothesis. Clinical Psychology Review, 31(4), 563–591. doi:10.1016/j.cpr.2010.12.007

Therapeutic Alliance, Process, and Supervision

Berry, C., & Greenwood, K. (2015). Hope-inspiring therapeutic relationships, professional expectations and social inclusion for young people with psychosis. Schizophrenia Research, 168(1), 153–160.

Fialkov, C., & Haddad, D. (2012). Appreciative clinical training. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 6(4), 204–210.

Fitzpatrick, M. R., Janzen, J., Chamodraka, M., & Park, J. (2006). Client critical incidents in the process of early alliance development: A positive emotion–exploration spiral. Psychotherapy Research, 16(4), 486–498. doi:10.1080/10503300500485391

Howard, F. (2008). Managing stress or enhancing wellbeing? Positive psychology’s contributions to clinical supervision. Australian Psychologist, 43(2), 105–113. doi:10.1080/00050060801978647

Huber, J. R., Rambo, A., Boyd, T. V., & Marquez, M. G. (2016). The marriage and family therapy career guide: Doing well while doing good. New York, NY: Routledge, 139 pp. $35.95. Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, 43(1), 173–174. doi:10.1111/jmft.12191

Schlechter, A. (2016). The positive approach to the diagnostic interview: Is talking about what’s wrong necessarily right? Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(10), S94–S94.

Sexton, T. L., & Schuster, R. A. (2008). The role of positive emotion in the therapeutic process of family therapy. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 18(2), 233–247.

Wade, J. C., & Jones, J. E. (2015). Strength-based clinical supervision: A positive psychology approach to clinical training. New York: Springer.

Signature Strengths Profile

Fückiger, C., Caspar, F., Grosse Holtforth, M., & Willutzki, U. (2009). Working with patients’ strengths: A microprocess approach. Psychotherapy Research, 19(2), 213–223. doi:10.1080/ 10503300902755300

Positive Psychology Application in Coaching Settings

Crabb, S. (2011). The use of coaching principles to foster employee engagement. The Coaching Psychologist, 7(1), 27–34.

Kauffman, C., & Linley, P. A. (2007). A pragmatic perspective: Putting positive coaching psychology into action. International Coaching Psychology Review, 2(1), 97–102.

Linley, P. A., & Kauffman, C. (2007). Positive coaching psychology: Integrating the science of positive psychology with the practice of coaching psychology. In Special Issue: Positive Psychology. International Coaching Psychology Review, 2(1), 5–8.

Positive Psychology Applications (Related Topics)

Fundamental Negativity Bias

Corns, J. (2018). Rethinking the negativity bias. Review of Philosophy and Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13164-018-0382-7

Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2015). The LIFE model: A meta-theoretical conceptual map for applied positive psychology. Journal of Happiness Studies, 16(5), 1347–1364.

Nesse, R. M. (1991). What good is feeling bad? The Sciences, 31, 30–37.

Winters-Stone, K., Lyons, K. S., Dobek, J., Dieckmann, N. F., Bennett, J. A., Nail, L., . . . Beer, T. M. (2016). Benefits of partnered strength training for prostate cancer survivors and spouses: Results from a randomized controlled trial of the exercising together project. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 10(4), 633–644.

Wood, A. M., & Joseph S. (2010). The absence of positive psychological (eudemonic) well-being as a risk factor for depression: A ten-year cohort study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 122, 213–217.

Zeigarnik, B. V. (1967). On finished and unfinished tasks. In W. D. Ellis (Ed.), A sourcebook of Gestalt psychology. New York: Humanities Press.

Character Strengths

Baumeister, R. F., Gailliot, M., DeWall, C. N., & Oaten, M. (2006). Self-regulation and personality: How interventions increase regulatory success, and how depletion moderates the effects of traits on behavior. Journal of Personality, 74(6), 1773–1802.

Cheung, C., & Yue, X. D. (2012). Sojourn students’ humor styles as buffers to achieve resilience. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 36(3), 353–364. doi:10.1016/j.ijintrel.2011.10.001

Cox, R. H. (2011). Applying spirituality in psychotherapy. PsycCRITIQUES, 56(33). doi:10.1037/a0024083

Davidson, L., Shahar, G., Lawless, M. S., Sells, D., & Tondora, J. (2006). Play, pleasure, and other positive life events: “Non-specific” factors in recovery from mental illness? Psychiatry, 69(2), 151–163. doi:10.1521/psyc.2006.69.2.151

Duckworth, A. L., & Seligman, M. (2017). The science and practice of self-control. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 12(5), 715–718.

Headey, B., Schupp, J., Tucci, I., & Wagner, G. G. (2010). Authentic happiness theory supported by impact of religion on life satisfaction: A longitudinal analysis with data for Germany. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(1), 73–82. doi:10.1080/17439760903435232

Smith, T. B., Bartz, J., & Scott Richards, P. (2007). Outcomes of religious and spiritual adaptations to psychotherapy: A meta-analytic review. Psychotherapy Research, 17(6), 643–655. doi:10.1080/10503300701250347

Stieger, S., Formann, A. K., & Burger, C. (2011). Humor styles and their relationship to explicit and implicit self-esteem. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(5), 747–750.

Whatley, L. R. (2014). The role of humility within personality architecture. Organization Development Journal, 32(1), 21–40.

Worthington, E. L., Hook, J. N., Davis, D. E., & McDaniel, M. A. (2011). Religion and spirituality. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67(2), 204–214. doi:10.1002/jclp.20760

Strengths-based Assessment

Avey, J. B., Luthans, F., Hannah, S. T., Sweetman, D., & Peterson, C. (2012). Impact of employees’ character strengths of wisdom on stress and creative performance. Human Resource Management Journal, 22(2), 165–181.

Duan, W., & Bu, H. (2017). Development and initial validation of a short three-dimensional inventory of character strengths. Quality of Life Research, 26(9), 2519–2531.

Furnham, A., & Lester, D. (2011). The development of a short measure of character strength. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 28(2), 95–101.

Jiang, X., & Shen, H. (2007). Positive psychology in psychological assessment and intervention. Chinese Journal of Clinical Psychology, 15(1), 99–101.

Joseph, S., & Wood, A. (2010). Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: Theoretical and practical issues. Clinical Psychology Review, 30(7), 830–838.

Kienfie Liau, A., Chow, D., Teck, K. T., & Senf, K. (2011). Development and validation of the personal strengths inventory using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 29(1), 14–26.

Laija-Rodriguez, W., Grites, K., Bouman, D., Pohlman, C., & Goldman, R. L. (2013). Leveraging strengths assessment and intervention model (LeStAIM): A theoretical strength-based assessment framework. Contemporary School Psychology, 17(1), 81–91.

Littman-Ovadia, H., & Steger, M. (2010). Character strengths and well-being among volunteers and employees: Toward an integrative model. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(6), 419–430.

Lopez, S. J. (2006). Counseling psychology’s focus on positive aspects of human functioning. The Counseling Psychologist, 34(2), 205–227. doi:10.1177/0011000005283393

Luong, G., Wrzus, C., Wagner, G. G., & Riediger, M. (2016). When bad moods may not be so bad: Valuing negative affect is associated with weakened affect–health links. Emotion, 16(3), 387–401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000132

Macaskill, A., & Denovan, A. (2014). Assessing psychological health: The contribution of psychological strengths. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 42(3), 320–337. doi:10.1080/03069885.2014.898739

McGrath, R. E., Rashid, T., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2010). Is optimal functioning a distinct state? The Humanistic Psychologist, 38(2), 159–169. doi:10.1080/08873261003635781

Otake, K., Shimai, S., Tanaka-Matsumi, J., Otsui, K., & Fredrickson, B. (2006). Happy people become happier through kindness: A counting kindness intervention. Journal of Happiness Studies, 7(3), 361–375.

Rashid, T. (2013). Assessing strengths in clinical practice. In J. Norcross (Ed.), Psychologists’ desk reference (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Rashid, T., Anjum, A., Quinlin, D., Niemiec, R., Mayerson, D., & Kazemi, F. (2013). Assessment of positive traits in children and adolescents. In A. Linley & C. Proctor (Eds.), Research, applications and interventions for children and adolescents: A positive psychology perspective (pp. 81–114). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Rashid, T., & Ostermann, R. F. (2009). Strength-based assessment in clinical practice. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 65, 488–498.

Tedeshi, R. G., & Kilmer, R. P. (2005). Assessing strengths, resilience, and growth to guide clinical interventions. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 36, 230–237.

Trompetter, H. R., de Kleine, E., & Bohlmeijer, E. T. (2017). Why does positive mental health buffer against psychopathology? An exploratory study on self-compassion as a resilience mechanism and adaptive emotion regulation strategy. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 41(3), 459–468.

Vertilo, V., & Gibson, J. M. (2014). Influence of character strengths on mental health stigma. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(3), 266–275. doi:10.1080/17439760.2014.891245

Character Strengths and Well-being

Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2008). Positive psychology and character strengths: Its application for strength-based school counseling. Journal of Professional School Counseling, 12, 85–92.

Park, N., Peterson, C., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2004). Strengths of character and wellbeing. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 23, 603–619.

Peterson, C. (2006). The Values in Action (VIA) classification of strengths: The un-DSM and the real DSM. In M. Csikszentmihalyi & I. Csikszentmihalyi (Eds.), A life worth living: Contributions to positive psychology (pp. 29–48). New York: Oxford University Press.

Proctor, C., Maltby, J., & Linley, P. (2011). Strengths use as a predictor of well-being and health-related quality of life. Journal of Happiness Studies, 12(1), 153–169. doi:10.1007/s10902-009-9181-2

Under- and Overuse of Strengths, Psychological Flexibility, Perspective (Wisdom)

Allan, B. A. (2014). Balance among character strengths and meaning in life. Journal of Happiness Studies, 16(5), 1247–1261.

Biswas-Diener, R., Kashdan, T. B., & Minhas, G. (2011). A dynamic approach to psychological strength development and intervention. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 6(2), 106–118.

Freidlin, P., Littman-Ovadia, H., & Niemiec, R. M. (2017). Positive psychopathology: Social anxiety via character strengths underuse and overuse. Personality and Individual Differences, 108, 50–54.

Glück, J., & Baltes, P. B. (2006). Using the concept of wisdom to enhance the expression of wisdom knowledge: Not the philosopher’s dream but differential effects of developmental preparedness. Psychology and Aging, 21, 679–690.

Rust, T., Diessner, R., & Reade, L. (2009). Strengths only or strengths and relative weaknesses? A preliminary study. Journal of Psychology, 143(5), 465–476.

Schwartz, B., & Sharpe, K. E. (2006). Practical wisdom: Aristotle meets positive psychology. Journal of Happiness Studies, 7(3), 377–395. doi:10.1007/s10902-005-3651-y

Character Strengths across Cultures

Brdar, I., & Kashdan, T. B. (2010). Character strengths and well-being in Croatia: An empirical investigation of structure and correlates. Journal of Research in Personality, 44(1), 151–154.

Dahlsgaard, K., Peterson, C., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2005). Shared virtue: The convergence of valued human strengths across culture and history. Review of General Psychology, 9(3), 203–213.

Kienfie Liau, A., Chow, D., Teck, K. T., & Senf, K. (2011). Development and validation of the personal strengths inventory using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 29(1), 14–26.

Laija-Rodriguez, W., Grites, K., Bouman, D., Pohlman, C., & Goldman, R. L. (2013). Leveraging strengths assessment and intervention model (LeStAIM): A theoretical strength-based assessment framework. Contemporary School Psychology, 17(1), 81–91.

Petkari, E., & Ortiz-Tallo, M. (2018). Towards youth happiness and mental health in the United Arab Emirates: The path of character strengths in a multicultural population. Journal of Happiness Studies, 19(2), 333–350.

Scales, P. C., Roehlkepartain, E. C., & Shramko, M. (2017). Aligning youth development theory, measurement, and practice across cultures and contexts: Lessons from use of the Developmental Assets Profile. Child Indicators Research, 10(4), 1145–1178.

Shimai, S., Otake, K., Park, N., Peterson, C., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2006). Convergence of character strengths in American and Japanese young adults. Journal of Happiness Studies, 7(3), 311–322.

Vela, J. C., Sparrow, G. S., Whittenberg, J. F., & Rodriguez, B. (2018). The role of character strengths and importance of family on Mexican American college students’ career decision self‐efficacy. Journal of Employment Counseling, 55(1), 16–26.

Positive Emotions

Danner. D., Snowdon, D., & Friesen, W. (2001). Positive emotions in early life and longevity: Findings from the Nun Study. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 804–813.

Davidson, R. J., Kabat-Zinn, J., Schmacher, J., Rosenkranz, M., Muller, D., Santorelli, S., . . . Sheridan, J. F. (2003). Alterations in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness meditation. Psychosomatic Medicine, 65, 564–570.

Fredrickson, B. L. (2001). The role of positive emotions in positive psychology. American Psychologist, 56, 218–226.

Fredrickson, B. L. (2013). Updated thinking on positivity ratios. American Psychologist, 68(9), 814–822. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0033584

Fredrickson, B. L., & Joiner, T. (2018). Reflections on positive emotions and upward spirals. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 13, 194–199. doi:10.1177/1745691617692106

Harker, L., & Keltner, D. (2001). Expressions of positive emotions in women’s college yearbook pictures and their relationship to personality and life outcomes across adulthood. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 112–124.

Kok, B. E., & Fredrickson, B. L. (2010). Upward spirals of the heart: Autonomic flexibility, as indexed by vagal tone, reciprocally and prospectively predicts positive emotions and social connectedness. Biological Psychology, 85(3), 432–436. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.09.005

Lyubomirsky, S., King, L., & Diener, E. (2005). The benefits of frequent positive affect: Does happiness lead to success? Psychological Bulletin, 131, 803–855.

Steptoe, A., O’Donnell, K., Marmot, M., & Wardle, J. (2008). Positive affect, psychological well-being, and good sleep. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 64(4), 409–415.

Zhang, Y., & Han, B. (2016). Positive affect and mortality risk in older adults: A meta-analysis. PsyCh Journal, 5(2), 125–138. https://doi.org/10.1002/pchj.129

Positive and Negative

Huta, V., & Hawley, L. (2010). Psychological strengths and cognitive vulnerabilities: Are they two ends of the same continuum or do they have independent relationships with well-being and ill-being? Journal of Happiness Studies, 11, 71–93.

Kuppens, P., Realo, A., & Diener, E. (2008). The role of positive and negative emotions in life satisfaction judgment across nations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95(1), 66–75. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.95.1.66

Lomas, T., & Ivtzan, I. (2016). Second wave positive psychology: Exploring the positive–negative dialectics of wellbeing. Journal of Happiness Studies, 17(4), 1753–1768. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-015-9668-y

Luong, G., Wrzus, C., Wagner, G. G., & Riediger, M. (2016). When bad moods may not be so bad: Valuing negative affect is associated with weakened affect–health links. Emotion, 16(3), 387–401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000132

Goal-Setting

Brunstein, J. C., Schultheiss, O. C., & Grassmann, R. (1998). Personal goals and emotional well-being: The moderating role of motive dispositions. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75, 494–508.

Oddli, H. W., McLeod, J., Reichelt, S., & Rønnestad, M. H. (2014). Strategies used by experienced therapists to explore client goals in early sessions of psychotherapy. European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling, 16(3), 245–266. doi:10.1080/13642537.2014.927380

Sheldon, K. M., Kasser, T., Smith, K., & Share, T. (2002). Personal goals and psychological growth: Testing an intervention to enhance goal attainment and personality integration. Journal of Personality, 70, 5–31.

Sheldon, K. M., Ryan, R. M., Deci, E. L., & Kasser, T. (2004). The independent effects of goal contents and motives on well-being: It’s both what you pursue and why you pursue it. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30(4), 475–486. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167203261883

Know Thy Self

Campbell, W., Bosson, J., Goheen, T., Lakey, C., & Kernis, M. (2007). Do narcissists dislike themselves “deep down inside”? Psychological Science, 18, 227–229.

Neisser, U. (1988). Five kinds of self-knowledge. Philosophical Psychology, 1, 35–59.

Ryff, C. D., & Singer, B. H. (2008). Know thyself and become what you are: A eudemonic approach to psychological well-being. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9(1), 13–39. doi:10.1007/s10902-006-9019-0

Travagin, G., Margola, D., & Revenson, T. A. (2015). How effective are expressive writing interventions for adolescents? A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 36, 42–55.

Walter, W. G. (1959). Know thyself. Physiotherapy, 45(1), 3–13.

Wilson, T. D., & Dunn, E. (2004). Self-knowledge: Its limits, value, and potential for improvement. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 493–518.

Prospection

Baumeister, R. F., Vohs, K. D., & Oettingen, G. (2016). Pragmatic prospection: How and why people think about the future. Review of General Psychology, 20(1), 3–16.

Emmons, R. A., & McCullough, M. E. (2003). Counting blessings versus burdens: An experimental investigation of gratitude and subjective well-being in daily life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 377–389.

Gilbert, D. T., & Wilson, T. D. (2007). Prospection: Experiencing the future. Science, 317, 1351–1354.

Roepke, A. M., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2016). Depression and prospection. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 55(1), 23–48.

Seligman, M. E. P., Railton, P., Baumeister, R. F., & Sripada, C. (2013). Navigating into the future or driven by the past. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 8(2), 119–141. doi:10.1177/1745691612474317

Travagin, G., Margola, D., & Revenson, T. A. (2015). How effective are expressive writing interventions for adolescents? A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 36, 42–55.

Watkins, P. C., Grimm, D. L., & Kolts, R. (2004). Counting your blessings: Positive memories among grateful persons. Current Psychology, 23, 52–67.

Flow and Engagement

Bassi, M., & Fave, A. D. (2004). Adolescence and the changing context of optimal experience in time: Italy 1986–2000. Journal of Happiness Studies, 5, 155–179.

Flemons, D. (2007). Finding flow. Psychotherapy Networker, 31, 67–71.

Massimini, F., & Delle Fave, A. (2000). Individual development in a bio-cultural perspective. American Psychologist, 55, 24–33.

Nakamura, J. (1988). Optimal experience and the uses of talent. In M. Csikszentmihalyi & I. S. Csikszentmihalyi (Eds.), Optimal experience: Psychological studies of flow in consciousness (pp. 319–326). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Motivation

Bassi, M., & Fave, A. D. (2004). Adolescence and the changing context of optimal experience in time: Italy 1986–2000. Journal of Happiness Studies, 5, 155–179.

Berg, M., Janoff-Bulman, R., & Cotter, J. (2001). Perceiving value in obligations and goals: Wanting to do what should be done. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27, 982–995.

Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (2000). The “what” and “why” of goal pursuits: Human needs and the self-determination of behaviour. Psychological Inquiry, 11, 227–268.

Overview of Happiness, Well-being, and Positive Psychology

Gable, S., & Haidt, J. (2005). What (and why) is positive psychology? Review of General Psychology, 9, 103–110.

Lyubomirsky, S., Sheldon, K. M., & Schkade, D. (2005). Pursuing happiness: The architecture of sustainable change. Review of General Psychology, 9(2), 111–131.

Rojas, M. (2011). Happiness, income, and beyond. Applied Research in Quality of Life, 6(3), 265–276. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11482-011-9153-7

Seligman, M. E. P., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55, 5–14.

Sheldon, K. M., & King, L. (2001). Why positive psychology is necessary. American Psychologist, 56, 216–217.

Health, Heredity, and Well-being

Diener, E., & Chan, M. Y. (2011). Happy people live longer: Subjective well-being contributes to health and longevity. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, 3(1), 1–43. doi:10.1111/j.1758-0854.2010.01045.x

Headey, B., Muffels, R., & Wagner, G. G. (2010). Long-running German panel survey shows that personal and economic choices, not just genes, matter for happiness. PNAS: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107(42), 17922–17926. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1008612107

Lawson, K. M., Davis, K. D., McHale, S. M., Hammer, L. B., & Buxton, O. M. (2014). Daily positive spillover and crossover from mothers’ work to youth health. Journal of Family Psychology, 28(6), 897–907.

Lykken, D. T., Bouchard, T. J. Jr., McGue, M., & Tellegen, A. (1990). The Minnesota Twin Family Registry: Some initial findings. Acta Geneticae Medicae et Gemellologiae, 39, 35–70.

Nes, R. B. (2009). Happiness in behaviour genetics: Findings and implications. Journal of Happiness Studies, 11(3), 369–381. doi:10.1007/s10902-009-9145-6

Ryff, C., Singer, B., & Dienberg Love, G. (2004). Positive health: Connecting well-being with biology. Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences, 359(1449), 1383–1394. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/4142142

Seligman, M. E. P. (2008). Positive health. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 57, 3–18.

Van Cappellen, P., Rice, E. L., Catalino, L. I., & Fredrickson, B. L. (2018). Positive affective processes underlie positive health behaviour change. Psychology & Health, 33(1), 77.

Vertilo, V., & Gibson, J. M. (2014). Influence of character strengths on mental health stigma. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 9(3), 266–275.

Will Crescioni, A., Ehrlinger, J., Alquist, J. L., Conlon, K. E., Baumeister, R. F., Schatschneider, C., . . . Dutton, G. R. (2011). High trait self-control predicts positive health behaviors and success in weight loss. Journal of Health Psychology, 16(5), 750–759.

Positive Clinical Psychology Journals

Special Issues of Journals on Positive Psychology

American Psychologist, Special Issue on Positive Psychology (55, January 2000)

Journal of Humanistic Psychology, Special Issue on Positive Psychology (41, Winter 2001)

The Psychologist, two issues (March 2003 and Autumn 2008)

Psychology in Schools, Special Issue on Positive Psychology in Schools (41, 2004)

International Coaching Psychology Review (2, 2007)

Professional School Counseling, Special Issue on Strengths-Based School Counseling (12, December 2008)

Journal of Clinical Psychology, Special Issue on Positive Interventions (65, May 2009)

Websites, Films, and Videos

Websites

PPT-related resources can be found at the following websites:

  • Tayyab Rashid: free assessment and option to retake the assessment, which includes character strengths and well-being (PERMA) with instant feedback available:

  • Positive Psychotherapy Facebook page:

  • Flourish: University of Toronto Scarborough’s Strength-Based Initiative, curated by Tayyab Rashid, offers free online clinical, positive psychology measures (feedback and retake options):

  • Positive Psychology Center: A plethora of positive psychology, well-being, and positive psychology resources is available at the Positive Psychology Center, University of Pennsylvania’s website:

  • Authentic Happiness: Complete free online measures of well-being and happiness with instant feedback:

  • Positive Psychology Daily News: To stay updated about positive psychology events:

  • Values in ActionInstitute on Character: Complete free online character strength measures:

  • Positivity Ratio: Learn about your positive to negative emotion ratio, also called the positivity ratio, at Barbara Fredrickson’s website:

Documentaries on Happiness and Positive Psychology

  • Happy: Directed by Roko Belic (2011) takes us on a journey from the swamps of Louisiana to the slums of Calcutta in search of what really makes people happy.

  • The Happiness Formula: Six-part BBC documentary aired in April 2006

  • HappinessHow to Find It, Understand It and Achieve It: ABC’s 20/20 episode aired on January 11, 2008

  • In Pursuit of Happiness: Canadian, documentary by Sarah Spinks

  • Introducing Positive Psychology: by PBS Montana

YouTube Videos

Search by title or key words within the YouTube search engine.

Character Strengths

  • Fairness: Al Pacino’s artful speech—Scent of a Woman

  • Fairness: The Emperor’s Club (Part 10)

  • Forgiveness: The Shawshank Redemption (Morgan Freeman scene)

  • Hope and Optimism: The Theory of Everything—While There Is Life, There Is Hope

  • Humility: Forrest Gump (4/10) Best Movie Quote—College Football Scene (1994)

  • Kindness: The Blind Side: The Real Story

  • Leadership: Gandhi: His Triumph Changed the World Forever

  • Leadership: Mentorship—Pay It Forward—Part 1

  • Love of Learning: Akeelah and the Bee—Big Words Come From Little Words (2006)

  • Perspective: Good Will Hunting—Park scene

  • Persistence: Protect Your Dreams—Pursuit of Happiness

  • Playfulness: Patch Adams (Complete Speech)

  • Playfulness and Humor: Favorite scene from Life Is Beautiful

  • Prudence: The Queen—A Diminished Institution (2006)

  • Purpose: Peaceful Warrior—Everything Has a Purpose

  • Resilience: I Can Only Imagine father/son; Team Hoyt—Dick and Rick Hoyt

  • Self-regulation: A Few Good Men—Self Regulation

  • Social Intelligence: The Blind Side—The Real Story (Inspirational)

  • Teamwork: Girls Softball Miracle—Central Washington vs. Western Oregon

Expert Talks on Character Strengths and Well-being

  • Fairness: Jonathan Haidt lecture on morality at Stanford

  • Gratitude: Robert Emmons: How gratitude heals, energizes, and changes lives, 2014

  • Hope: Making hope happen: Create the future you want for yourself and others, 2013

  • Love: Barbara Fredrickson “Love—A New Lens on the Science of Thriving”

  • Maximizing/Minimizing: Barry Schwartz on The Paradox of Choice

  • Meaning: Victor Frankl: Search for Meaning

  • Persistence: Willpower and how to make it work for you with Roy Baumeister at Happiness & Its Causes, 2014

  • Positive Communication: John Gottman: Positive Relationships—The Magic Ratio

  • Posttraumatic Growth (PTG): Hold The Door for Others—A nonprofit inspired by 9/11

  • Posttraumatic Growth (PTG): Inspirational Speech by Dr. Randy Pausch: The Last Lecture (On the Oprah Winfrey Show)

  • Purpose: Job Crafting—Amy Wrzesniewski on creating meaning in your own work

  • Resilience: Barbara Fredrickson: Using positivity to bounce back from inevitable setbacks.

  • Savoring: Carl Honore: Slowing down in a world built for speed

  • Self-efficacy: The power of believing that you can improve

  • Spotting Strengths: Tayyab Rashid at TEDxUTSC: Assessment: What Are Your Character Strengths? What Are You Good At?

TED Talks on Happiness, Well-being, and Resilience

Search by topic at www.ted.com.