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(p. 166) How to Build Rapport: Assessing the Effectiveness of ORBIT Training with Police Interviewers 

(p. 166) How to Build Rapport: Assessing the Effectiveness of ORBIT Training with Police Interviewers
Chapter:
(p. 166) How to Build Rapport: Assessing the Effectiveness of ORBIT Training with Police Interviewers
Author(s):

Laurence J. Alison

, Chloë Barrett-Pink

, Frances Surmon-Böhr

, Neil D. Shortland

, Emily K. Alison

, and Paul Christiansen

DOI:
10.1093/med-psych/9780197545959.003.0008
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date: 27 January 2021

This chapter examines the impact of the UK National Counter-Terrorism Training program (Alcyone). Alcyone is a 6-day course that provides the following: (1) psychological training in Observing Rapport Based Interpersonal Techniques (ORBIT), (2) input on pre-interview briefing, and (3) legislation and input on safety interviewing. Approximately 80% of the course involves scenario-based role-play with additional knowledge checks and short lecture inputs. The chapter details the analysis used to assess the program’s impact. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that Alcyone-trained officers showed a significantly greater reliance on adaptive interpersonal skills that had been taught in the course and demonstrated significantly fewer maladaptive interpersonal behaviors that they had been taught to avoid. There was also a significant increase in the use of rapport-based behaviors and a greater extraction of information from the suspects. Although several other factors may also account for an increase in yield, the increase in all the aspects that these officers had been taught in the course provides support that the course had a positive impact. This has implications for interview training programs and for the dissemination of evidence-based practice for counterterrorism interviewing.

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