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(p. 127) Forms and Worksheets 

(p. 127) Forms and Worksheets
Author(s):

Steven A. Safren

, Susan E. Sprich

, Carol A. Perlman

, and Michael W. Otto

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY ONLINE (www.oxfordclinicalpsych.com). © Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Clinical Psychology Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 30 May 2020

Accessing Treatments ThatWork Forms and Worksheets Online

All forms and worksheets from books in the TTW series are made available digitally shortly following print publication. You may download, print, save, and digitally complete them as PDFs. To access the forms and worksheets, please visit http://www.oup.com/us/ttw.

Worksheet 1 Problem-Solving: Selection of Action Plan

Worksheet 2 Steps for Sorting Mail

Worksheet 3 Developing an Organizational System

Worksheet 4 Strategies for Reducing Distractions

Worksheet 5 3-Column Thought Record

(p. 133) Handout A Preliminary Instructions for Adaptive Thinking

The purpose of using thought records is to identify and modify negative, automatic thoughts in situations that lead to feeling overwhelmed.

The first step in learning to think in more useful ways is to become more aware of these thoughts and their relationship to your feelings. If you are anticipating a stressful situation, or a task that is making you feel overwhelmed, write out your thoughts regarding this situation.

If a situation has already passed and you find that you are thinking about it negatively or if, in retrospect, you realize that you were having unhelpful thoughts, list your thoughts for this situation.

The first column is a description of the situation.

The second column is for you to list your thoughts during a stressful, overwhelming, or uncontrollable situation.

The third column is for you to write down what emotions or feelings you are having when thinking these thoughts (e.g., depressed, sad, angry).

The fourth column is for you to see if your thoughts match the list of “thinking errors.” These may include:

  • All-or-Nothing Thinking

  • Overgeneralizations

  • Jumping to Conclusions (Fortune Telling/Mind Reading)

  • Magnification/Minimization

  • Emotional Reasoning

  • “Should” Statements

  • Labeling and Mislabeling

  • Personalization

  • Maladaptive Thinking

  • Overly Optimistic Thinking

Worksheet 6 4-Column Thought Record

(p. 135) Handout B Instructions for Completing the 5-Column Thought Record and Developing a Rational Response

The purpose of adaptive thinking is to promote optimal thinking when you are feeling stressed. The steps that are involved can be achieved using the rest of the worksheet. Throughout the week when you are feeling stressed, sad, or overwhelmed, continue to list your thoughts for each situation. If you are anticipating a stressful situation or a task that is making you feel overwhelmed, write out your thoughts regarding this situation. If a situation has already passed and you find that you are thinking about it negatively, list your thoughts for this situation.

The first column is a description of the situation.

The second column is for you to list your thoughts during a stressful, overwhelming, or uncontrollable situation.

The third column is for you to write down what emotions you are having and what your mood is like when thinking these thoughts (e.g., depressed, sad, angry).

The fourth column is for you to see if your thoughts match the list of “thinking errors” These may include:

  • All-or-Nothing thinking

  • Overgeneralizations

  • Jumping to Conclusions (Fortune Telling/Mind Reading)

  • Magnification/Minimization

  • Emotional Reasoning

  • “Should” Statements

  • Labeling and Mislabeling

  • Personalization

  • Maladaptive Thinking

  • Overly Optimistic Thinking

In the last column, try to come up with a rational response to each thought, or to the most important negative thought. The rational response is a statement that you can say to yourself (p. 136) to try to feel better about the situation. Questions to help come up with this rational response can include the following:

  • What is the evidence that this thought is true?

  • Is there an alternative explanation?

  • What is the worst thing that can happen?

  • Has this situation unreasonably grown in importance?

  • What would a good coach say about this situation?

  • Have I done what I can do to control it?

  • If I were to do anything else, would this help or hinder the situation?

  • Am I worrying excessively about this?

  • What would a good friend say to me about this situation?

  • What would I say to a good friend about this situation if he or she were going through it?

  • Why is this statement a cognitive distortion?

  • Is it helpful to focus on this thought at this moment?

Worksheet 7 5-Column Thought Record

Worksheet 8 Pros and Cons of Procrastination

Worksheet 9 Treatment Strategies and Usefulness

Worksheet 10 One-Month Review