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(p. 35) Letter to His Family 

(p. 35) Letter to His Family
Chapter:
(p. 35) Letter to His Family
Author(s):

Donald W. Winnicott

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780190271336.003.0004
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Originally published in Rodman, F. R. Winnicott: Life and work. Cambridge, MA: Perseus, 2003, p. 27.
Excerpt from a letter to Winnicott’s father, Sir John Frederick, his mother, Elizabeth, and his two sisters, Kathleen and Violet.

3 November 1913

The missing one is coming back soon! Only two more Fridays, two more Saturdays and two more Sundays … Now let me see! What have I to thank you for this week. How can people deny the existance [sic] of the science of telepathy? How did Mother know that a few weeks ago I possessed not a farthing, except that telepathy played a leading part? Aha. Never mind how! I got my 5/-. HA! …

Yes, well I am longing to get home now. It seems very wonderful that the time is going so quickly. I am having a wonderfully good time here,i too good did I hear some one say? Well that may be. I hope not. I am starting another sheet, but I shall not have time to fill it, I am afraid. I am sitting at the back of the hall, and a chap to the right has very dexterously taken off his coat, unhinged his collar and waiste-coat [sic] back … and put on his coat again. This was done without his being spotted, but now he looks exactly like a parson and is doing all manner of antics, imitating the Head, the Bursar and anyone who occurs to his mind. He is really a rather humorous lad. (p. 36)

Notes:

Editorial Note i Winnicott had begun boarding at The Leys School, Cambridge, at the age of 14.