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(p. 433) Communicating and Not Communicating Leading to a Study of Certain Opposites 

(p. 433) Communicating and Not Communicating Leading to a Study of Certain Opposites
Chapter:
(p. 433) Communicating and Not Communicating Leading to a Study of Certain Opposites
Author(s):

Donald W. Winnicott

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780190271381.003.0073
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date: 11 December 2019

In this paper, Winnicott proposes that at the centre of each individual is an area not to be exploited or invaded in analysis and in ordinary life. He writes that there is a right not to communicate alongside the fundamental need to do so, which Winnicott links to the fantasy of being found. The individual is an isolate who can engage in object relations so long as he cannot be fully ‘found’. Winnicott bases this proposition on the illusion of the early infant, that out of helpless dependence he has ‘created’ the actual mother/object. This early engagement with reality is as valid as all explicit communication and may be the source of artistic and cultural creativity. He detects in the artist the co-existence of the need to communicate and the need not to be found. Clinical examples illustrate his thesis.

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