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(p. 397) Review: Infantile Autism: By Bernard Rimland (New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1964) 

(p. 397) Review: Infantile Autism: By Bernard Rimland (New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1964)
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(p. 397) Review: Infantile Autism: By Bernard Rimland (New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1964)
Author(s):

Donald W. Winnicott

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780190271398.003.0062
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date: 14 October 2019

Winnicott’s review of Rimland’s book Infantile Autism. After many years of experience, Winnicott does not clearly see why those described as having infantile autism should be theoretically cut off from the total subject of schizophrenia of infancy and childhood apart from teaching purposes. For Winnicott, Rimland is not up to date with regard to the study of the earliest stages of integration of the personality derived from the theories of psychoanalysis. For Winnicott, the mental health of the individual is laid down at the beginning of life, when the infant’s dependence on the mother and her care is nearly absolute.

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