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(p. 329) Intergenerational Relationships in Later-Life Families: Adult Daughters and Sons as Caregivers to Aging Parents 

(p. 329) Intergenerational Relationships in Later-Life Families: Adult Daughters and Sons as Caregivers to Aging Parents
Chapter:
(p. 329) Intergenerational Relationships in Later-Life Families: Adult Daughters and Sons as Caregivers to Aging Parents
Author(s):

Mary Ann Parris Stephens

and Melissa M. Franks

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780195115468.003.0012
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date: 09 April 2020

This chapter examines the ways in which a parent’s chronic illness or disabling health condition affects the patterns of support provided by their adult children. It discusses the role of adult daughters as caregivers, and reviews extensive research literature on middle generation women who often juggle demands from many roles in the domains of family and work while providing care to their ill parents. The more limited body of research on the role of adult sons who assume parent-care responsibilities is also discussed, and explores why fewer adult sons than daughters are active support providers.

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