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(p. 1) DSM-5 generalized anxiety disorder: the product of an imperfect science 

(p. 1) DSM-5 generalized anxiety disorder: the product of an imperfect science
Chapter:
(p. 1) DSM-5 generalized anxiety disorder: the product of an imperfect science
Author(s):

Gavin Andrews

, Alison E. J. Mahoney

, Megan J. Hobbs

, and Margo Genderson

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780198758846.003.0001
Page of

date: 23 October 2019

This chapter describes the development of the psychiatric classification of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The chapter chronicles the introduction of GAD in DSM-III as a residual diagnosis, its subsequent revision and refinement to enhance diagnostic reliability and validity for DSM-III-R and DSM-IV, and the recent controversies, proposals, and decision-making processes surrounding the current classification in DMS-5. The history of the GAD diagnosis demonstrates the delicate balance that nosolgists seek to strike between diagnostic utility, reliability, validity, and the political process.

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