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(p. 307) Psychosocial Treatments for Bipolar Disorder 

(p. 307) Psychosocial Treatments for Bipolar Disorder
Chapter:
(p. 307) Psychosocial Treatments for Bipolar Disorder
Author(s):

Anjana Muralidharan

, David J. Miklowitz

, and W. Edward Craighead

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199342211.003.0010
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date: 22 November 2019

Pharmacological interventions remain the primary treatment for bipolar disorder. However, adjunctive psychosocial interventions have the potential to increase adherence to medication regimens, decrease hospitalizations and relapses, decrease severity of symptoms, improve quality of life, and enhance mechanisms for coping with stress. Group psychoeducation, designed to provide information to bipolar patients about the disorder and its treatment, leads to lower rates of recurrence and greater adherence to medication among remitted bipolar patients at both short- and long-term follow-up. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as an ancillary treatment has found mixed results but generally supportive evidence indicating that it is useful in preventing relapse to depression in remitted patients. Family-based intervention, such as Family-Focused Therapy (FFT), may be combined with pharmacotherapy to reduce recurrences and hospitalization rates in adult patients.

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