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(p. 172) Phylogenetic and Ontogenetic Contributions to Today’s Obesity Quagmire 

(p. 172) Phylogenetic and Ontogenetic Contributions to Today’s Obesity Quagmire
Chapter:
(p. 172) Phylogenetic and Ontogenetic Contributions to Today’s Obesity Quagmire
Author(s):

Elliott M. Blass

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199738168.003.0026
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date: 06 December 2019

Chapter 26 discusses phylogenetic and ontogenetic contributions to obesity. It argues on empirical grounds that all aspects of mammalian feeding systems are geared toward overfeeding. Under normal circumstances in which food availability limits individual obesity, population obesity is held in check, by an inadequate food supply and not by homeostatic constraints. In contrast a seemingly unlimited supply of readily available, cheap, energy-dense foods fabricated for taste, makes the principled evolutionary prediction that a significant portion of the population partaking of that cornucopia will become obese.

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