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(p. 367) Taxes on Energy-Dense Foods to Improve Nutrition and Prevent Obesity 

(p. 367) Taxes on Energy-Dense Foods to Improve Nutrition and Prevent Obesity
Chapter:
(p. 367) Taxes on Energy-Dense Foods to Improve Nutrition and Prevent Obesity
Author(s):

John Cawley

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199738168.003.0055
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date: 23 October 2019

This chapter discusses each of the steps by which a tax on food would affect consumption and weight. It discusses public opinion regarding taxes on energy-dense foods, practical considerations for the design of food taxes, the possibility that producers will lower (or even raise) the pre-tax price in order to influence the amount of the tax that gets passed on to consumers, own-price and cross-price elasticities of demand, which indicate how taxes will affect consumption of the taxed goods and substitute foods, proposals to earmark revenue from food taxes for related public health efforts, and how state and local food taxes may to some extent be evaded through cross-border shopping in certain areas. The final section presents estimates of how taxes on specific energy-dense foods can affect weight.

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