Show Summary Details
Page of

(p. 173) Students From Military Families 

(p. 173) Students From Military Families
Chapter:
(p. 173) Students From Military Families
Author(s):

Courtney D. Carter

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199766529.003.0012
Page of

date: 14 November 2019

Military deployments can put significant strain on a student, and if applicable, the remaining caregiver. In fact, having a parent deployed to a war zone can be one of the most stressful events a child can experience. These students often are at increased risk for depression, behavioral problems, decreased academic performance, and emotional challenges. Unfortunately, many students have experienced long-term separation of a military parent(s) due to military involvement overseas. As of December 2007, the United States alone had over 360,000 active-duty military personnel deployed in more than 150 countries around the world, resulting in approximately 700,000 children with at least one parent deployed6. Deployments are often long and the students therefore rely on educators to play a significant role in their lives. Additional concerns exist for large number of children with non-deployed military parents, including those in the National Guard and Reserves. Numerous suggestions and classroom activities are provided.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Clinical Psychology requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.