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(p. 191) Bullying, Rejection, and Isolation: Lessons Learned from Classroom Peer Ecology Studies 

(p. 191) Bullying, Rejection, and Isolation: Lessons Learned from Classroom Peer Ecology Studies
Chapter:
(p. 191) Bullying, Rejection, and Isolation: Lessons Learned from Classroom Peer Ecology Studies
Author(s):

Handrea Anita Logis

and Philip C. Rodkin

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199950706.003.0016
Page of

date: 19 November 2019

Bullying conveys a strong message of rejection, which can thwart youths’ sense of belongingness and self-efficacy, putting them at risk of forming suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially if they are children with mental health issues. Considering that most bullying occurs at school, we draw upon peer-ecology studies to examine classroom factors that can be conducive to bullying, rejection, and isolation, which may increase the risk of suicidality. The effects of hierarchical network structures on bullying and rejection, as well as teaching practices associated with healthier peer social relationships, are discussed. This chapter concludes with the suggestion that creating peer social ecologies characterized by equality, acceptance, and cooperation may be an effective way to reduce bullying and suicide among youth.

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