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(p. 31) Suicidal Risk as a Function of Bullying and Other Victimization Exposures 

(p. 31) Suicidal Risk as a Function of Bullying and Other Victimization Exposures
Chapter:
(p. 31) Suicidal Risk as a Function of Bullying and Other Victimization Exposures
Author(s):

Melissa K. Holt

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199950706.003.0003
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date: 10 December 2019

The link between bullying and suicide has garnered significant media attention. Correspondingly, research on this topic has found that bullying involvement in any capacity is associated with higher rates of suicidal ideation and behaviors. In line with a social-ecological framework, studies have explored whether this association varies by sex, type of bullying involvement, or form of bullying. Furthermore, investigations have increasingly considered how factors beyond bullying (e.g., depression) might inform the relationship between bulling involvement and suicidality. In particular, this chapter highlights that other victimization exposures (e.g., child maltreatment) might be particularly salient to consider, given their overlap with bullying involvement and their mental health implications. The chapter closes with implications for schools and clinicians, and recommendations for future research directions.

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