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(p. 50) Suicidal Ideation and Bullying: An Ecological Examination of Community Impact 

(p. 50) Suicidal Ideation and Bullying: An Ecological Examination of Community Impact
Chapter:
(p. 50) Suicidal Ideation and Bullying: An Ecological Examination of Community Impact
Author(s):

Pamela Orpinas

and Arthur M. Horne

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199950706.003.0005
Page of

date: 14 October 2019

The ecological model is useful to reveal the multiple risk and protective factors associated with suicide and aggression. This study examined the single and additive impacts that a lack of positive family, peer, and teacher relationships has on suicidal ideation and aggression among tenth-graders. Twelve percent of students reported suicidal ideation, and they had significantly worse scores in peer aggression and victimization, dating violence, alcohol and drug use, and delinquency than students who did not report suicidal ideation. The proportion of students reporting suicidal ideation was 3% for those with positive relationships with parents, peers and teachers, and 32% among those with no positive relationships. Aggression also increased as the number of positive relationships decreased. The study highlights the importance of support from multiple layers of the ecological model. The chapter concludes with recommendations for health care providers, families, educators, and policy makers for developing protective environments for adolescents.

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