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(p. 104) Cultural Competence and Prevention Programming 

(p. 104) Cultural Competence and Prevention Programming
Chapter:
(p. 104) Cultural Competence and Prevention Programming
Author(s):

Cynthia Hudley

DOI:
10.1093/med:psych/9780199950706.003.0009
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date: 20 November 2019

Bullying, victimization, and risk for suicide are serious and interrelated problems for adolescents today. The prevalence of these mental health challenges varies by demographic variables, including race and ethnicity, as well showing areas of robust convergence across all groups of adolescents. This chapter selectively discusses the meaning of “culture” and its significance for understanding intervention programming and then examines several points of convergence and divergence in the literature on adolescents and considers ways in which these populations can be best served. Finally, I provide a conceptual model for the development of culturally competent prevention and intervention programming. The model is purposefully general because many programs must simultaneously serve youth of various backgrounds. I posit a series of principles that must be considered when developing prevention programming for any group, whether it comprises members of one or multiple cultures.

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